Winning COVID-19 Blog 1: Vectrus’ Passion For Keeping Employees Safe

EBT Innovation - A Key Enabler For Employees To Return To Work

While companies around the world have grappled with the challenge of managing through the COVID-19 crisis, ProcessMAP Corporation, the industry leader in offering a data intelligence platform for employee Health and Safety, and Environmental Sustainability (EHS), has been conducting one of the largest EHS leadership roundtable – Winning COVID-19 with ProcessMAP  – on a weekly basis.  The weekly forum brings together distinguished EHS leaders from Fortune 1000 companies, experts from the fields of public health, legal, and technology sectors to share effective strategies, best practices, and innovative solutions to minimize the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on employee safety and business operations.

As part of our weekly thought leadership and best practices roundtable discussion, we had the privilege to hear from Lidia Peterson, who serves as the Executive Director, Environment, Safety and Health at Vectrus, a 7,200 employee company that provides facility and base operationssupply chain and logistics servicesinformation technology mission support; and engineering and digital technology services primarily to U.S. Government customers around the world.  Lidia also chairs the COVID-19 pandemic planning and leadership council.  We learned how the company uses its Vectrus Operations Center (VOC) that serves as the integration center for Vectrus to manage key aspects of responding to the COVID-19 crisis.

Vectrus has successfully implemented an enterprise-wide framework to prevent the spread of the virus and has taken a systematic approach to screening, quarantining, and managing infected employees.  In the virtual roundtable, there was keen interest from the audience on Vectrus’ methodology on its Exposure Decision Tree and their approach to a Person Under Investigation (PUI); the key pillars to keep employees and contractors safe. Lidia shared her perspective on the key steps that Vectrus has undertaken to minimize supply chain disruption from the COVID-19 pandemic. As our entire customer base is looking forward to opening their businesses and operations, it was a learning opportunity for everyone to hear Lidia’s views on getting buildings and workplaces prepared. 

Thank you Lidia for your insights and views, your passion for keeping your employees and clients safe, and your willingness to share with the entire EHS community as we continue to navigate the new normal. 

Interesting Fact:  Vectrus is a leading employer of veterans. 35% of Vectrus employees have military backgrounds. 

This blog is a part of a new series of curated content that ProcessMAP will be sharing with the larger EHS community. Click Here to read the next blog in this series.

#StaySafe

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ProcessMAP Responds To The COVID-19 Pandemic…One Year Later

ProcessMAP Responds To The
COVID-19 Pandemic…One Year Later

This month marks one year since several countries across the world entered into a lockdown in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On March 17, 2020 we closed our office locations in the United States, Canada, and India, and all ProcessMAP employees began working from home. Like many other companies, our leadership team believed that working from home for a short period would keep all our employees safe from COVID-19 exposure, and at the same time, continue normal business operations.

We quickly learned that asking employees to work from home with little notice meant that our staff were working at their kitchen counter, on the sofa, or for some, on their bed. At the same time, employees who are parents of school-aged children quickly became schoolteachers, Zoom facilitators and physical education coaches, and they also were managing pet care and elder care. 

After about three weeks, we had a better understanding of the extent of the coronavirus outbreak and how it affected the safety operations of our customers, as well as our own employees. It also became evident that the remote working arrangement was going to continue for the foreseeable future in a rapidly evolving environment of a global health and safety crisis. 

The first thing we needed to address was helping our employees in creating a proper workspace within their homes. Our Human Resources department surveyed the physical needs of employees, and ordered desks, lamps, headsets, monitors and even ergonomically designed office chairs to ensure that our team members were sufficiently equipped to be able to perform their work tasks from home. The long-term health and well-being of our employees was of paramount importance. 

We also understood that with all employees working from their homes, we were missing out on the camaraderie and team spirit that helps to motivate and inspire our staff. While conference calls were on the rise, face-to-face interactions were no longer happening. To keep teams connected, we scheduled company-wide town hall meetings, department meetings and other virtual team gatherings to help everyone to feel virtually closer together. These included coffee breaks, virtual team lunches, and virtual “Art of Living” classes, which guided participating employees through exercises related to deep breathing, meditation, and mindfulness, for relaxation and stress management.  

While our team was demonstrating their passion for supporting our customers in their “home office” environments, we realized that schedule flexibility was an important consideration as employees were also juggling other priorities, including helping their children attend school remotely, caring for aging family members and managing a host of other household responsibilities. 

We felt it was important to express our appreciation to our employees’ family members for sharing their loved one and their home with ProcessMAP, and for adapting, along with our employees, to this new “working from home” situation. To thank our employees’ families, we organized Family Dinner Night, where we had meals delivered to our employees and their families at home, and we all ate together virtually.

Image: A screenshot of select employees participating in a virtual “Family Dinner Night”

The ProcessMAP team continued to quickly respond to customer needs and even found new ways of supporting our customers throughout this pandemic, hosting a weekly COVID-19 Roundtable where customers could collaborate on building playbooks to manage the impact of the pandemic, share actionable ideas and best practices, and help each other through the numerous challenges brought on by COVID-19.  

While our team was just getting used to their new normal at home, we realized our customers needed us to rapidly innovate solutions to help enable them to keep their operations safe and healthy. Our schedule for planned product development was put on hold and the entire team focused on creating a suite of solutions to give customers the ability to monitor their employees’ wellbeing through an employee screening and health management app; to perform health risk assessments; to identify organizational risks and evaluate the impact they could have on an organization; to strengthen their COVID-19 preparedness and response by properly auditing facility readiness; to conduct and manage daily sanitation and other inspections; and to manage all types of incidents, including COVID-19-related illnesses.

Frequently over the past year, I have marveled at the ProcessMAP team’s spirit. Like other companies, we quickly pivoted to an entirely virtual workforce and pushed even harder to support our customers. Our team has learned to brainstorm and collaborate long distance, instead of sitting around one conference room table and writing ideas on a white board. I am so proud of our team’s creativity, ingenuity, flexibility as a group, and I truly admire our team’s commitment and dedication to our customers.

The year 2020 was eventful from a global perspective because of COVID-19, but it was also important to ProcessMAP in that it marked our twentieth year in business. Thanks to the dedication and commitment of our team along with our customers’ support, I cannot wait to see how our team rises to the occasion for the next 20 years.

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Can CCS Be The Solution To The Issue Of Global Warming?

Can CCS Be The Solution To The Issue Of Global Warming?

The Bloomberg New Energy Finance has recently predicted that by 2013 the EU carbon market will be worth € 80 billion and then increase to € 94 billion by 2014. This market in essence is a response based on free market principles to the issue of climate change. Even after the checkered track record of Kyoto Protocol the world has not lost faith in the idea that emission reduction and mitigation is the most effective way to fight Global Warming. As we continue to cap and trade our net emission and try to make a quick buck while saving the planet another idea has been gaining prominence; Carbon Sequestration.

ccs-global-warming

Carbon Sequestration or CCS holds the promise of continued use of fossil fuel without the guilt of carbon emission. More than the lure of guilt free pollution the apparent failure of current measures at arresting absolute emission is prompting nations to make CCS a key element of their environmental policy. (See: UK CCS Roadmap). Can CCS redeem the companies from the austerity of low carbon footprint? In an ideal world, Federal legislations and tax incentives would have stopped or even just reduced climate change and produced a stronger global economy. But it is easier said than done.

Some believe that CCS might enable us to meet the UN defined target of keeping warming below 20C. Consider a study conducted by a leading group of climate researchers at the Oxford University. They suggest that fossil fuel producers should be mandated to sequester a steadily increasing fraction of the carbon they extract from the ground, with the fraction set to reach 100 per cent before total emissions into the atmosphere exceed an agreed total, and costs passed on to fossil fuel consumers. They have christened the concept as SAFE. “The neat thing about SAFE carbon is that is breaks the apparent conflict between short-term economic development and long-term climate protection, ” says Dr. Myles Allen, Physics professor at Oxford University and an author of the paper. Dr. Allen is saying that a country would no longer need to accept limits on their consumption as long as they use SAFE carbon.  

But the industry is finding little economic incentive in the idea. Take the example of power plants, equipping coal- and gas-fired plant with CCS makes them considerably more expensive to run. The efficiency also takes a toll as more fuel has to be burnt to produce the same amount of electricity. The problem lies in the high cost of the current process. The CO2 has to be captured first, and then transported thousands of meters below the earth to a secure location, most likely in liquid form via pipelines. The disposal site should also be thoroughly inspected to ensure there are no leakages. Someone needs to bear the extra cost. On top of this are some grave safety concerns. The Lake Nyos disaster is a dreadful reminder of how a poor implementation of the project can backfire. Source: IEA CCS 2050 

However, there are some champions of the cause. Statoil, a Norwegian oil company, had been injecting CO2 into an old reservoir on the North Sea Sleipner field since 1996 and have disposed of almost 13 million tons of CO2 in this manner. But the technology still has a long way to go before finding popular acceptance. Al Gore had written in a New York Times column that the notion of carbon capture and sequestration as “the strategy for human survival” is “a cynical and self-interested illusion.” Perhaps this decade will be more promising for CCS.

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How FCA Is Preparing Its Facilities For Employees To Return To Work

How FCA Is Preparing Its Facilities For Employees To Return To Work

FCA and ProcessMAP

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA)one of the largest automotive manufacturers worldwide, has established several protocols intended to keep the virus out and to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the work environment. Greg Rose, EH&S Director for FCA for all of North America, recently shared the steps his team has undertaken and communicated to employees to help ensure the safety of themselves and their colleagues. FCA has created a playbook to help employees understand all the behaviors that are essential for opening their plants and for employees returning to work. Any employee or contractor can refer to the playbook, on-demand, to reinforce what has become the “new normal” in workplace safety.

Pre-work checks are critically important at FCA. Each employee completes a COVID-19 self-check everyday before coming to work. They each take their own temperature and log it into an app before departing for work. If employees are sick, as measured by an Elevated Body Temperature (EBT), or by Influenza-Like-Illness (ILI) symptoms, they are asked to stay home. This helps keep employees with an EBT away from FCA facilities. Moreover, FCA is using thermal cameras to help identify employees with EBT as large groups of employees arrive at their work facilities.

The company has issued face masks to all employees and expects them to wear the masks at all times during work. Employees are required to maintain social distancing, both while performing their job functions as well as in their activities when taking breaks, visiting the cafeteria and the restrooms. Employees are encouraged to frequently practice personal hygiene and to sanitize their workstations regularly.  Communications reinforcing these practices are highly visible throughout FCA facilities.

Furthermore, FCA has undertaken risk mitigation steps at workstations to help increase social distancing within their facilities.  Barriers such as plexiglass sheets have been installed in production areas to help the company to protect its employees that are in close proximity without creating additional risk in the workstation from pinch points or trip hazards.

The company is now in the process of auditing their preparedness and validating their readiness to restart full-scale operations. Greg Rose stated, “We’ve gone from a company that makes automobiles to a company that has needed to make themselves experts in dealing with the spread of a virus.”

Pete Hadad, Manager EHS, shared FCA’s audit checklist of 92 questions along with protocols and policies that are applicable to all of FCA’s locations worldwide. FCA is utilizing SPARC, their instance of ProcessMAP’s EHS platform, to perform these audits.  

The detailed audit reports are proving to be very helpful in identifying the facilities that are ready for re-opening and/or scaling to full capacity. 

As multiple states within the United States, and countries globally, slowly relax restrictions to allow people to get back to work, a forward-looking company like FCA is setting the right example in taking abundant precautions to proactively protect its employees. 

Kudos to Greg Rose, Pete Hadad and the entire EHS team at Fiat Chrysler Automobiles for living by the mantra – Safety First!

This blog is a part of a new series of curated content that ProcessMAP will be sharing with the larger EHS community. Watch this space for our next blog! To read our previous blog in this series, Click Here!

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How Automation & Intelligent Safety Practices Reduce Injuries

How Automation & Intelligent Safety Practices Reduce Injuries

Accidents resulting in injuries have become all too common in the automotive industry. With the rise in popularity of machinery and automation, it’s time to take a step back and look at how leveraging it all can create a safer workplace.

Understanding injuries and their cost

First things firsthow do workplace accidents affect an employer? Based off of 2013 injury data, the Liberty Mutual Safety Index pegs the cost of “the most disabling workplace injuries” at $61.88 billion. That’s just for one year.

“Overexertion and repetitive motion injuries cost companies $21.05 billion in 2013.”

If you dig a little deeper, you’ll find there are certain areas that seem to rank too high given the modern workplace. Overexertion and repetitive motion accounted for roughly 32.1 percent of all reports, which equates to $21.05 billion, per the source.

This is an incredible amount of money to be spending on easily preventable accidents. The source of these injuries seem to be heavily focused on musculoskeletal, as well. The Department of Labor and Industries aggregated data from 1995 to 2005 on the source of pain experienced by employees. Nearly 33 percent of all reports involved muscle harm. While this isn’t a majority, the cost of said injuries totaled 58 percent. This means that while they may not occur most often, they do represent one-third of reports, and they are indeed the most expensive in terms of claims cost.

Automation is a must

There are two definitive steps a company can take to reduce the risk of injury. The first involves a complete top-down makeover when it comes to safety culture surrounding employee well-being. Preventing accidents in the workplace must be paramount.

To create transparency from C-suite executives down to entry-level workers, Environmental, Health and Safety software should be used. This allows for the following:

  • Risk management assessment through aggregation of injury data.
  • Safety risk assessments per activity and area of workplace.
  • Analytical insight into safer practices.

Leveraging EHS safety software will give safety managers the ability to read and react to real-time situations, and protect workers accordingly. Automation isn’t the futureit’s already here.

Rely less on brawn

Ridding a workplace of ergonomic injuries, the second step an organization should take, relies heavily on both smarter methods of work and leaning on machinery when possible.

According to DOLI, start by removing any obstacles that could spawn an injury. This includes placing heavy objects at chest level to reduce back injuries, as well as hanging heavy parts that are used frequently, rather than putting them on the ground.

Intelligent Safety Practices

The source also reported that leveraging jacks and lifts to move around heavy objects can help cut down on back, wrist and shoulder pain because it reduces the chances of overexertion. 

Heavy lifting is the primary cause behind many musculoskeletal disorders, as a report from the U.S. National Library of Medicine concluded. Avoiding it at all costs by using machinery and automation to do it will greatly relieve a workplace’s injury rate for this category.

How Automation & Intelligent Safety Practices Reduce Injuries?

  • Automative systems are geared towards reducing data-recording human errors so that relevant safety data can be as accurate as possible. 
  • Using more intelligent process improvement methods by relying on machinery and technology is often more effective than throwing resources and more work-hands into a problem.

Manual assembly and repair methods should also be phased out where possible. This includes, but is not limited to, manufacturing lines, bolt tightening and sanding down parts. All of these methods have mechanical counterparts that can speed up production and keep employees safe at the same time.

It should be noted that proper safety gear must always be used with machinery. Failure to do so could result in loss of limbs, lacerations or other more serious injuries. With the switch to a mechanized workplace comes responsibility that should be maintained.

By incorporating safe practices, utilizing intuitive data analysis from EHS safety software, and relying more on machinery, the automotive industry can reduce the risk of injury from repetitive actions or overexertion.

Using this approach, companies like Harley Davidson significantly improve their safety performance, earning the company industry accolades such as the 2016 Verdantix EH&S Information Management Award.

Which safety processes have helped you reduce injuries? Leave a comment below to let us know.

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How Integrated Training Management Can Prevent Safety Accidents

How Integrated Training Management Can Prevent Safety Accidents

Keeping workers safe on the job requires a holistic approach, and without training management software, it’s difficult to ensure that the right employees get the right training at the right time.

Keeping workers safe on the job requires a holistic approach, though it can be challenging. On any given day, a safety manager can be running from worksite to worksite ensuring employees aren’t harmed, as well as creating and executing training programs.

But where does ensuring employees get the training they need and are aware of constantly changing compliance updates come into play?

Training management software keeps things easy

The truth is, there are so many changes that take place in highly regulated industries like construction, health care or finance that compliance changes specific to health & safety management sometimes go unnoticed. Then, at the end of the year employees may receive a comprehensive training seminar that tries to fit all the new information workers need to rely on and retain in a regular session. At its core, this is an outdated practice and often a last-ditch effort.

NAVEX Global conducted a report that sought managers’ and senior executives’ top three issues in relation to policy management, and what it found wasn’t too surprising:

  • Keeping policies updated with evolving regulations: 47 percent.
  • Employee training: 40 percent.
  • Ensuring accuracy and reducing policy redundancy: 32 percent.

“…A lot of people are unhappy with their policy management programs when it comes to compliance. Even with those who are happy, there’s always room for improvement,” Randy Stephen, report co-author, told PC Magazine. “We saw that both the budget and responsibility for policy management can be spread across a large group of business units, and that dispersed responsibility within the organization can contribute to a lack of efficiency.”

Knowing about the transitions in policy is only half the battle—instituting educational sessions aimed at helping employees understand and implement these new rules in their daily routines is key. In this capacity, training management software has allowed organizations that use Environmental, Health and Safety systems to ensure employees are up to date on the latest policy developments and that any learning or performance gaps are identified and addressed.

training management Software
Training management software offers organizations a way to streamline regulatory updates into educational sessions.

Digital training management starts a domino effect

Compliance is an area of the business that can become nearly autonomous with the right process in place. NAVEX Global study authors felt the results pointed to a clear need for an automated policy management system, but that doesn’t exactly cover all of the bases. After a safety manager learns about a change in safety regulations, he or she still has to introduce it to workers in a way that will have a meaningful impact.

“Training management software automates policy compliance.”

In steps the Forgetting Curve, a well-understood theory that ascertains a person will forget 70 percent of the information learned within a 24-hour time period, according to Xcelus. This means the last-minute training sessions aiming to cram in every policy change enacted in the last two years aren’t helping in the slightest.

The key to overcoming this curve is regular reminders or subsequent educational sessions. Training management software allows a safety manager to roll out daily, weekly or monthly training sessions to ensure 100 percent retention of new information, as well as:

  • Keep track of attendance, scores, scheduling and course participation.
  • Get training materials right from the source of regulatory changes and audits.
  • Leverage organizational incidents and course scores to understand which gaps require action.

Having a pulse on industry developments is just one part of the solution—companies need to create a holistic system for enforcing pertinent policy updates rather than throwing last-minute training sessions together as a stopgap. Having all of this information at the push of a button also allows businesses to employ analytics to evaluate their efforts.

A report from the Italian Association of Chemical Engineering found that a scientific approach to evaluating safety training methods is one of the more effective ways to understand if educational sessions are working. This is done by tracking experimental data—otherwise known as incidence reports—and pairing that up with a quantitative measure, which in this case are the test scores. If test scores are low and injury reports are high in a certain area of operation, it’s clear that more training is required.

An effective digital training management strategy isn’t just the shiny new process companies implement to stay modern—it’s becoming necessary in light of fast-paced, constant regulatory changes across multiple industries.

How is your company providing employees with the training they need? Leave a comment below to let us know how your efforts are going.

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Industry Experts Gather For Next-Generation EHS Collaboration

Industry Experts Gather For Next-Generation EHS Collaboration

This week we’re convening customers, industry analysts and executives for our annual User Conference in Hollywood Beach, Florida. Attendees are gaining valuable insight on industry challenges and best practices, while experiencing dynamic on-site demos of ProcessMAP’s offerings. As Day 1 comes to a close, we thought we’d share some key insights from the event thus far. 

In two sessions this morning, we heard from Nate Snyder, Global Manager, Operations EHS at Valvoline, and Gregory Monzo, EVP, Product Management at ProcessMAP, about incident management systems and empowering workers to make a safer workplace.

EHS Collaboration

Make Incident Management Reporting a Priority

Valvoline is a 150-year old startup with 6,000 employees and products sold in 140 countries via 20 global manufacturing and distribution plants, as well as more than 1,000 company-owned and franchised Valvoline Instant Oil Change stores. With a goal of optimizing performance through technology, and by using leadership, employee engagement, risk reduction and performance measurement, Valvoline engaged ProcessMAP for a two-pronged EHS approach. 

  1. EHS for manufacturing locations focused on reducing energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, waste generation and enhancing recycling practices. As well as a safety focus on material handling and ergonomics, slips, trips and falls, and remote sales workforce safety.
  2. EHS for retail locations focused on reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gasses, as well as a safety focus on slips, trips and falls, sprains and strains, employee turnover, and customer liability.

The program was implemented just 12 months ago and Valvoline has already seen impactful results, including enhanced processes and improved timeliness of reporting and notifications. The company is even working toward a zero incident EHS culture using predictive analytics, consistent reporting and real-time data. 

In this session, Nate shared that near-miss reporting data is an essential piece of the complex EHS puzzle at an organization like Valvoline. With their new program, they’re able to ask the right questions through clear, concise and optimized reporting.

ProcessMAP Incident Management Roadmap

With the industry changing rapidly due to digital transformation drivers like the cloud, big data analytics and the Internet of Things, customers are needing to reinvest back into their EHS technology every four to five years. Gregory described how ProcessMAP is optimizing its platform to address evolving customer challenges around incident management in the following ways:

  • Enhanced incident reporting including initial severity classification of injury or illness at the time of reporting
  • CAPA management changes including associate/classified countermeasures for preventative action
  • Investigation improvements including established responsible team for investigation process and new critique option to determine effectiveness of environmental investigation

You can learn more about ProcessMAP’s Incident Management Software here: https://www.processmap.com/solutions/health-safety/incident-management/

Additional Topics Covered – and More to Come!

Other sessions today included “Measuring safety performance using a balanced scorecard” and “Aggregating data for improved decision making.” Loren Bowe of LCBowe Consulting discussed in the latter session the importance of benchmarking processes and data. Companies today are finding it incredibly valuable to learn what competitors are doing from an EHS data perspective, and some are comparing themselves against industry averages for their benchmarking. Partnering with a company like ProcessMAP can help ensure you’re up to speed on the latest changes not only to EHS as a whole but also to EHS practices within your specific industry. 

See our resources for more industry insights: https://www.processmap.com/resources/ 

Over the next few days, attendees at our User Conference have access to a wide array of more than 30 best practice sessions on topics that address the next generation of EHS challenges, including business intelligence, mobile and emerging technology. Participants will gain valuable hands-on experience through product demos and case studies that showcase ProcessMAP’s software solutions, in addition to user labs and industry-specific workshops led by power users and technical experts.

Click here for the day two User Conference recap with an overview of industry trends and topics covered at the event! 

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Customers And Thought Leaders Talk Mobile-First EHS Management

Customers And Thought Leaders Talk Mobile-First EHS Management

As we close out Day 2 of our annual User Conference, we’re sharing more of the insights, discussion topics and key trends our customers, industry analysts and executives are talking about at the show. Check out our Day 1 recap if you haven’t read it yet. 

We had two sessions today covering the vital role of mobility in EHS software, including in a panel session with Learning Care Group’s Donna Pomerson, Jeff Spaude and Toni O’Grady, and in a session with Eugene Kouroptev, VP, Product Development at ProcessMAP.

EHS Management

How Mobility Can Bolster Business Intelligence

Learning Care Group (LCG) is the second-largest for-profit child care provider in North America and a leader in early education, with nearly 50 years of experience in inspiring children to love learning. With more than 900 schools across the country and beyond, LCG has a capacity to serve more than 130,000 children. LCG engaged ProcessMAP to ensure organization-wide, efficient compliance with a mobile-first, analytics-driven approach. 

Program goals included:

  • Streamline compliance processes by reducing time to complete checklists
  • Enhance transparency with better end-to-end reporting
  • Provide a single repository for all regulatory visits, corrective action plans and safety audits
  • Improve safety performance and safety culture
  • Prevent recurrence of frequent issues and identify trends in compliance issues 

Since launching the program, LCG has implemented 10,000 iPads with 20,000 daily users – typically teachers who need something easy to use that will get the job done quickly – across its organization, resulting in a 33 percent improvement in checklist compliance and 93 percent completion of checklists. Through integrated checklist management, integrated compliance visits and permit tracking, and analytics-driven decisions, LCG built a culture of safety and compliance. The company even reduced the time to aggregate and analyze safety and compliance data by 90 percent, enabling its EHS and compliance managers to more effectively leverage data to implement improvements.

The LCG team shared that, by working with ProcessMAP, they were able to not only implement this comprehensive safety initiative, but also see an immediate ROI to a mobile-first, data-driven approach.

Find out more about ProcessMAP’s compliance and quality services here: https://www.processmap.com/solutions/quality/

ProcessMAP Mobile App Roadmap

As our world becomes increasingly digital and the workplace ever more mobile, ProcessMAP is focused on ensuring our technology meets customers’ needs. Our platform of device agnostic applications empowers users to perform audits, track action items, and report safety hazards on-the-go, from any device at any time. In his session, Eugene outlined how ProcessMAP is ensuring mobility across its offerings in the following areas: 

  • Expand to text and SMS notifications for the mobile application
  • Focus on workflow, notifications and validation for further optimization
  • Enable customers to define their own application logic and have data available in real time
  • Incorporate customer feedback to create the best possible mobile experience 

You can learn more about how ProcessMAP is enabling a mobile-first EHS management approach here: http://www.processmap.com/why-processmap/

Industry Insights and Themes

Other sessions today included “IIOT Integration with EHS” and “Data Intelligence” customer presentations and panels, as well as deep dives into managing employee risk and emerging technologies. Overall, attendees at our User Conference have had access to more than 30 best practice sessions on topics that address the next generation of EHS challenges. 

Thursday marks the close of our 2017 event – if you missed us at our User Conference this year, make sure to check it out next year. In the meantime, see our resources for more industry insights: https://www.processmap.com/resources/

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Industry Experts Gather For Next-Generation EHS Collaboration

Industry Experts Gather For Next-Generation EHS Collaboration

This week we’re convening customers, industry analysts and executives for our annual User Conference in Hollywood Beach, Florida. Attendees are gaining valuable insight on industry challenges and best practices, while experiencing dynamic on-site demos of ProcessMAP’s offerings. As Day 1 comes to a close, we thought we’d share some key insights from the event thus far. 

In two sessions this morning, we heard from Nate Snyder, Global Manager, Operations EHS at Valvoline, and Gregory Monzo, EVP, Product Management at ProcessMAP, about incident management systems and empowering workers to make a safer workplace.

Make Incident Management Reporting a Priority

Valvoline is a 150-year old startup with 6,000 employees and products sold in 140 countries via 20 global manufacturing and distribution plants, as well as more than 1,000 company-owned and franchised Valvoline Instant Oil Change stores. With a goal of optimizing performance through technology, and by using leadership, employee engagement, risk reduction and performance measurement, Valvoline engaged ProcessMAP for a two-pronged EHS approach. 

  1. EHS for manufacturing locations focused on reducing energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, waste generation and enhancing recycling practices. As well as a safety focus on material handling and ergonomics, slips, trips and falls, and remote sales workforce safety.
  2. EHS for retail locations focused on reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gasses, as well as a safety focus on slips, trips and falls, sprains and strains, employee turnover, and customer liability.

The program was implemented just 12 months ago and Valvoline has already seen impactful results, including enhanced processes and improved timeliness of reporting and notifications. The company is even working toward a zero incident EHS culture using predictive analytics, consistent reporting and real-time data. 

In this session, Nate shared that near-miss reporting data is an essential piece of the complex EHS puzzle at an organization like Valvoline. With their new program, they’re able to ask the right questions through clear, concise and optimized reporting.

ProcessMAP Incident Management Roadmap

With the industry changing rapidly due to digital transformation drivers like the cloud, big data analytics and the Internet of Things, customers are needing to reinvest back into their EHS technology every four to five years. Gregory described how ProcessMAP is optimizing its platform to address evolving customer challenges around incident management in the following ways:

  • Enhanced incident reporting including initial severity classification of injury or illness at the time of reporting
  • CAPA management changes including associate/classified countermeasures for preventative action
  • Investigation improvements including established responsible team for investigation process and new critique option to determine effectiveness of environmental investigation

You can learn more about ProcessMAP’s Incident Management Software here: https://www.processmap.com/solutions/health-safety/incident-management/

Additional Topics Covered – and More to Come!

Other sessions today included “Measuring safety performance using a balanced scorecard” and “Aggregating data for improved decision making.” Loren Bowe of LCBowe Consulting discussed in the latter session the importance of benchmarking processes and data. Companies today are finding it incredibly valuable to learn what competitors are doing from an EHS data perspective, and some are comparing themselves against industry averages for their benchmarking. Partnering with a company like ProcessMAP can help ensure you’re up to speed on the latest changes not only to EHS as a whole but also to EHS practices within your specific industry. 

See our resources for more industry insights: https://www.processmap.com/resources/ 

Over the next few days, attendees at our User Conference have access to a wide array of more than 30 best practice sessions on topics that address the next generation of EHS challenges, including business intelligence, mobile and emerging technology. Participants will gain valuable hands-on experience through product demos and case studies that showcase ProcessMAP’s software solutions, in addition to user labs and industry-specific workshops led by power users and technical experts.

Click here for the day two User Conference recap with an overview of industry trends and topics covered at the event! 

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Common Elements That Can Be Dangerous In The Workplace

Common Elements That Can Be Dangerous In The Workplace

Companies that fail to provide their employees with a safe working environment are leaving themselves open to both legal action and federal citations. As our work/life balance continues to skew toward the workplace, there is an expectation that employers should be taking safety as seriously as they do the bottom line.

Employee Safety Is Always The Priority

In recent years, industrial companies have replaced the break-and-fix attitude to physical assets with predictive analytics that pinpoint when a machine will fail. This proactive stance has, in many cases, had a positive effect on production and made the workplace more efficient. It is not unreasonable to assume that this attitude should be mirrored when it comes to employee safety.

Not all workplaces are created equal, of course, but there is no reason why a company should not be looking to leverage health and safety software. Taking that into account, there are numerous common hazards that people can be exposed to that can benefit from safety management software

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Environmental, Health and Safety management operations have changed significantly amid the adoption of modern technologies capable of performing tasks that have traditionally been more costly and time-consuming.

Nonetheless, there are some who may still be considering the idea of supplementing (or replacing) their business’ or organization’s tried-and-true EHS setup with modern solutions. In order to do so properly, there are several things that those in charge of the transition process need to know before drawing up plans, purchasing new EHS tools or making hasty changes to daily operations.

According to LNS Research, the overall modernization of EHS operations is sometimes referred to as “EHS 4.0” — described as a reference to “Industry 4.0, also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution.” This has brought about advances from traditional EHS management and operational approaches with the advent of groundbreaking technologies.

Here are three things that you should know to bring your organization’s into the EHS 4.0 phase — or a suitable equivalent:

1. Know which aspect(s) of your EHS operations need an overhaul
Today’s EHS solutions harness the advantages offered by modern technologies adopted across many industries and bring with them comprehensive new services and tools. Before taking the leap into the modern EHS world, one should consider which aspects of their existing operations need changes or improvements. According to Industrial Safety and Hygiene News, tech trends proving highly innovative to business development are the internet of things, big data analytics, cloud computing and mobile applications; all of these can be applied to different areas of EHS operations.

According to LNS Research’s Peter Bussey, organizations’ EHS management today has generally followed several trends that have brought about a change in the way it works in relation to different departments’ regular operations. The trend towards digital solutions, for example, has resulted in an increased appreciation and investment in EHS as an asset that “creates and delivers value,” Bussey wrote. Higher standards for transparency and disclosure across many industries today require a reliance on the study and mitigation of risk that can be provided by EHS professionals.

One also should consider the fact that many organizations’ mainstays are aging and nearing retirement. Regardless of whether these employees are already familiar with new EHS technologies, they will need to be replaced with a new generation of workers that bring with them their own skills and work habits.

2. Know the potential results – the good, bad and the ugly
When used correctly, EHS technology can help organizations to overcome longstanding barriers that have prevented improvement in many areas and resulted in adverse incidents, according to Bussey. Some of the main hindrances include disparate systems, data sources and collaboration combined with information siloing. Good planning when making changes to an organization’s EHS standards will in turn produce desired results.

When implemented under a poorly planned design, new EHS technologies can present their own risks, whether they be through flaws in changes to operations or vulnerabilities in networked IT systems or new IoT devices, for example. On a bad day, a business with a flawed workplace safety design and poor network security might see a minor injury or downtime. On the ugliest of days, these could result in severe injuries to personnel, major downtime and any associated penalties or legal proceedings.

According to ISHN, it’s recommended that administrators and managers know their organizations’ current EHS tech integration plans and work with all teams involved. This can help to get a stronger understanding of the changes that will take place and manage any associated risks.

3. Know that modern EHS tools are varied
Different industries require different solutions when it comes to today’s digital EHS solutions, while organizations with existing EHS systems and solutions in place may require the adoption of new technologies in certain areas, but don’t need a complete overhaul.

One broad example of the capabilities of modern EHS technologies is what EHS Daily Advisor reports is the use of virtual reality goggles and associated software for employee safety training. In the energy industry, more specifically, one modern EHS solution is the deployment of drones fitted with specialized technology for inspections on oil rigs and ships, among other properties, according to Quartz. In turn, this improves operational efficiency and allows for a reallocation of human resources away from avoidable risky scenarios.

When considering EHS mobile applications for business use on popular smartphones, for example, IMEC Technologies recommends that one first consider whether they field proven, native to certain brands and have the ability to be efficiently scaled to a certain number of users. An application array used effectively should record more data than previously thought possible, which can provide new insights into hazards and required remediation efforts.

ProcessMAP provides EHS tools that can innovate companies’ safety cultures. Connect with us to learn more about how you can improve your workplace risk management today.

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Behavior-Based Safety And Your Organization

Behavior-Based Safety And Your Organization

There are various ways companies can approach health and safety in the workplace, but some work out better for certain organizations. Safety managers must understand the intricacies in each strategy and map out how effective they would be in their particular workplaces. 

There’s no better place to start your research than with one of the most respected and widely adopted plans: behavior-based safety.

Shifting focus

BBS seeks to reinforce safe employee actions, rather than focus efforts entirely on making the workplace safe. Developed in part due to the research from Herbert William Heinrich, a Environmental Health and Safety Today report noted nearly 9 in every 10 incidents can be attributed to actions by the employee, rather than his or her environment.

By focusing on process, through motivation, education and reinforcement, it’s believed the chances a worker partakes in an unsafe method for completing his or her job decreases exponentially. EHS Today listed the following as additions to everyday workplace routines that support this theory:

  • Keeping track of injury-free days.
  • Consistent training seminars on best practices, especially with compliance.
  • Calling for near-miss accidents to be reported.
  • Supporting transparency between all employees, regardless of authority, regarding incidence rates.

It’s important to note a BBS program’s success falls directly on management’s shoulders. Because the program will hinge on employees reporting unsafe work conditions, recognizing dangerous methods and procedures, leadership must convey the fact that no repercussions will take place for reporting something as basic as a faulty tool.

How to get started

With transparency to key performance metrics and the ability to diagnose incident root cause and contributing factors as two key factors, it makes sense that many companies looking to deploy a BBS program lean on a health and safety management system to help the organization do so.

Health and safety software allows for real-time digital reporting, which will be all but vital moving forward with changes in legislation regarding how organizations must submit incident reports to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Furthermore, mobile reporting gives site managers the ability to quickly report near-misses without lag time or having to take too much time out of their day to do so. By removing barriers that surround incident reporting, companies can rest easy knowing employees company-wide are equipped to handle OSHA mandated processes and procedures.

“BBS relies on transparency through digital reporting.”

By making identification of unsafe behaviors, a main component of a safety program, safety managers can identify and mitigate risks and ensure that workers get the training and information they need. A knowledgeable worker without fear of being reprimanded or fired for blowing a whistle will ultimately save more of his or her peers from future injury.

This leads me to the financial benefits of a BBS strategy. Fewer employee injuries means reduced workers’ compensation costs, higher productivity levels and better margins all around. OSHA reported that a large, Fortune 500 corporation increased productivity by 13 percent with an established safety program in place. It’s expected that placing a premium on safety usually nets a company savings between 20 and 40 percent.

A new year means a different way to approach safety. If your company is looking to take its safety performance to the next level, a behavior-based approach could be the perfect way to drive positive change, and subsequently performance.

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