Ocean Spray goes SHARP on Safety

Ocean Spray goes SHARP on Safety

On a recent ProcessMAP EHS Leadership Roundtable, we heard from Lisa Buck, Corporate Safety Manager for Ocean Spray, a cooperative with more than 2,000 employees working at 20 locations to produce more than 1,000 products in over 100 countries. Lisa shared how Ocean Spray elevated its corporate safety program by implementing the OSHA SHARP Program (Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program).

When Lisa arrived at Ocean Spray’s Henderson, Nevada facility in March 2015, the company had experienced some serious injuries and its incident rate had risen, and so one of her first challenges was to improve and strengthen Ocean Spray’s safety program. From a previous experience in implementing the SHARP program at another organization, Lisa understood that this would be one of the best ways to be able to address issues for Ocean Spray.

SHARP is a completely voluntary program. Organizations embark upon it with their local or state OSHA office and the certification process takes approximately 12 to 14 months. One of the benefits to working towards a SHARP certification is that a company is exempt from programmed inspections. The SHARP team visits the facility and conducts floor audits of production areas. They look at a company’s policies and procedures and give a note card that says the organization is exempt from programmed inspection for a period of time, which is typically 30 days.

OSHA works collaboratively with the company by issuing corrective actions. The company must respond in writing by a certain deadline, though extensions may be granted if a company needs more time. The point of the process is to identify hazards and be able to correct them within a timely period. If all corrections are completed, the company is then recommended to be entered into the SHARP program, which then must be approved on either a regional or state level. Once the application is reviewed and approved, the company is awarded the SHARP certification.

For Lisa and her team at Ocean Spray, getting the green light from her management team was extremely important. Talking with employees and management teams, Lisa emphasized that the most important objective in the SHARP process is protecting their people. She believed that if the organization could do a better job of protecting people by obtaining this certification, and working towards identifying risks, removing or eliminating them, that would be the most important accomplishment for Ocean Spray.

Lisa and the safety team recognized early on that the Ocean Spray workforce was hungry to do better and that they wanted to improve their safety standards. As the safety team explained to employees that following the SHARP program would put Ocean Spray on a path to be among the best companies for safety, the entire team embraced the idea of eliminating injuries. By educating employees about the fundamentals of the SHARP program and how it would help reduce and eliminate injuries, even the most skeptical employees started to buy into the program.

To help change the perception of safety within the company, Lisa and her team implemented a program called “Berry Bucks,” which rewarded employees for safe behaviors observed on the shop floor. The opportunity to be recognized and rewarded for safe behavior created a buzz among employees and a shift in behavior. Employees could redeem their “Berry Bucks” in the company store for a variety of Ocean Spray swag.

Once a company achieves OSHA’s VPP certification, it becomes exempt from programmed inspections for a two to three-year period, depending on the state. In the VPP program, OSHA conducts a recertification audit every three years. Throughout the certification process, Lisa worked closely with the OSHA auditors, discussing issues the company was working to fix as well as sharing best practices

One of the most significant benefits of achieving OSHA’s SHARP and VPP certifications was lowering the facility’s recordable injury rates. This is a natural result of adhering to an exemplary program. The company saw lower incident rates, fewer people getting injured and lower severity. The Henderson facility’s success became a model for the rest of the organization, and now two other locations will be working towards SHARP certification in the coming months.

In selecting ProcessMAP for its cloud-based EHS solutions, Ocean Spray selected the Behavior-based Safety and Incident Management modules, among other solutions offered by the platform. Prior to implementing ProcessMAP, Ocean Spray was using SharePoint to document incidents, with no real management of the incident, and no root-cause analysis, or documentation of contributing factors. Ocean Spray is also using Compliance Tasks and Calendar Tasks, enabling the safety organization to better track activities at their 20 locations across multiple countries.

Ocean Spray also selected ProcessMAP’s Audit and Inspection Module, to help the safety team to audit 39 different programs. Each site is audited every other year, and the manual process the team was following was cumbersome and time consuming. 

Now the safety team can trend and track root causes and contributing factors within a single facility or among all facilities. They can isolate tracking to just beverage or food producing facilities. The real-time reporting is a far cry from the paper-based methodology the company used previously. Data is updated in real time, and the team uses iPads to track observations and inspections without being connected to Wi-Fi. These activities can be entered offline and then the data uploaded to the cloud once employees are able to connect. 

In considering key takeaways, the Ocean Spray safety team observed that getting senior management and corporate commitment to pursuing the OSHA SHARP and VPP programs is critical. Making sure that all employees from the plant director to the hourly employees understand why the company is pursuing these programs and how the programs will benefit them is vital. Engaged employees become safety compliant, and when they are rewarded for good safety behavior, ultimately that leads to fewer injuries and decreased severity

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Reduction Of Frequency Or Reduction Of Severity – Part 1

Reduction Of Frequency Or Reduction Of Severity – Part 1

As a Safety professional, I have been on both sides of this question and different arguments are presented by different stakeholders. 

  • Should your organization have a risk function that operates autonomously from the EH&S Function, the debate may be more focused on reduction of severity. 
  • Should EH&S align with an operational component, the benchmark may be slanted towards reduction of frequency. 

Both types of reductions are intended to reduce the risk faced by the workforce, however; the two approaches may vary widely.  In this 2-part blog series, I will address these 2-oposing ideologies that ultimately have the same goal – keeping the workforce safe and well.    

Reduction of frequency is a common measurement aimed at establishing a benchmark of Safety well-being.  The Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) is typically the go-to source to gather industry baseline Total Recordable Incident Rates (TRIR) based on industry information.  This industry baseline is categorized by the North American Industry Classification System, NAIC.  A workplace’s TRIR is calculated by capturing total number of recordable injuries over a year, multiplied x200,000 (typical number of hours worked in a 52-week year, given 2-weeks’ vacation); divided by total hours worked by that group or company.

safety management software

Now, armed with your TRIR, you may research your NAIC code and look at your peer-business group’s average TRIR.  Should your TRIR fall under the national average, you are optimistic about your workplace safety programs and initiatives.  Should your TRIR surpass your peer-business group’s average, it is obvious that your workplace is incurring more injuries than the same business-peer group – and this problem needs to be tackled here-and-now!

Given a higher TRIR than your peer-business groups, an organization’s efforts may be targeted towards deploying an EHS learning management strategy to train, or retrain the workforce on equipment or material handling, personal protective equipment (PPE) utilization or requirements, or to re-emphasize the reporting of Near-Miss occurrences.  As an intervention strategy, Behavior Based Safety software (BBS) may be applied to forge a technological safety-partnership throughout different departments, or management.  This will be a targeted effort to continually focus on the workforce’s actions and daily safety behavior.  Lastly, an EHS Audit Software utilization will determine and measure these effort’s adoption and adherence.  This is a great approach that many professionals have undertaken and gained great successes.  However; while the above is a normal strategy for frequency reduction, a focus on severity reduction looks very different. 

While frequency reduction efforts are proactive and sure to be effective at reducing injuries, illnesses, and fatalities – is this your organization’s goal?  If it is, our EHS Software has encouraged many organizations to refocus and rededicate their current-state EHS training management system, as well as move towards a highly configurable behavior-based safety software.  Finally adding a powerful EHS Audit Software solution will further improve compliance, identify training opportunities, and add valuable insight in keeping your workplace healthy and safe.  Is Reduction of Severity your goal? 

Stay tuned and look for Part-2 of this blog series!

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EHS 2019 Recap: Notable News, Insights And Trends

EHS 2019 Recap: Notable News, Insights And Trends

As we’ve made it halfway through 2019, it may be useful to check in on some of the major trends and insights occurring in the Environmental, Health and Safety sector. According to the National Safety Council, a worker is injured on the job every seven seconds. It isn’t just up to the workers and their managers to maintain a safe workplace culture. Business leaders and executives also hold the responsibility of keeping employees safe. With today’s high-quality EHS capabilities, organizations are more empowered than ever to create and maintain safe workplaces. Although EHS technologies have effectively mitigated many workplace injuries, we are far from an incident-free world.

To be the best at what we do, it’s important that we look at the industry as a whole, taking into account advancements in technologies and priorities. Here are some of the major EHS trends and insights of 2019 thus far:

Increased Spending on EHS

There are some areas of business that companies’ decision-makers are trying to cut back on. Others require extra attention and increased spending. This year, it seems that EHS has become a spending priority for business leaders looking to step up their compliance and productivity. According to Verdantix, a renowned research and consulting voice in the EHS market, worldwide spending on EHS solutions is projected to increase by 4% in 2019. Businesses that hadn’t yet jumped onboard the EHS software train seem to be doing so of late, and those that have already implemented these technologies into their solutions are upping their spend. Budget increases are put toward things like improved training, digital upgrades and updated personal protective equipment.

The Rise of Cross-functional Collaboration

One of the major issues facing EHS teams is the siloed way in which they report data and conduct their work. This two-dimensional approach presents a hindrance to performance improvement. Since EHS occurs in multiple disciplines of the business, it is crucial that organization leaders encourage their workers and managers to adopt EHS as an interconnected function across all areas of the business. It’s not just something those who work directly on the site have to deal with and manage. It’s the responsibility of every member of the workforce to be accountable for various EHS functions.

User-friendly EHS Solutions

EHS 2019 Trends

Business leaders want the most advanced technologies keeping their employees safe and operations in check. However, advanced doesn’t necessarily mean complex. 

Rather, companies are finding themselves too busy to take on complicated software platforms, and instead tend to favor user-friendly interfaces. Not only do accessible technologies make it easier for business leaders to track problematic areas in their businesses, but they also provide greater ease for  workers and managers who are using the platform on site. When the technology is simple to learn and use, employees are more likely to use it; it’s that simple

Adopt Automation or Risk Falling Behind

A few years ago, advanced EHS technology was a new feature that some organizations adopted in order to improve their compliance and safety measures. It was valuable but not yet crucial, as a majority of businesses continued to work with manual capabilities when this technology was still new.

As organizations have fully integrated intelligent software into their EHS capacities, businesses that have yet to take on this technology are falling behind. It isn’t a matter of staying ahead of the competition. It’s about staying on pace with them. Businesses that are still relying on manual or antiquated EHS capabilities are likely doing so to cut down on costs. However, they are increasing their chances of experiencing an issue in compliance or a lapse in workflow that result from workplace injuries or near misses, two incidents that can severely impact a business’s bottom line.

Businesses that make the decision to mitigate workplace incidents through the implementation of EHS software and other innovative risk management tools can expect a quick return on investment. When organizations reduce the appearance of workplace incidents — and fix close calls before they turn into issues — they can save a significant amount of money that they would have lost due to decreased productivity and that they may have had to pay in legal fees when an issue was a result of noncompliance.

In addition to the benefits an efficient EHS system can have on a business’s bottom line, it can positively impact the culture. When workers believe their company is making an effort to improve their safety and workplace conditions, they will feel validated and empowered. This in turn can lower turnover rates – a huge issue facing businesses in all sectors that work directly with EHS.

Whether you’d like to implement an EHS solution or adopt a new, more sophisticated system, consider ProcessMAP’s innovative EHS suite. Connect with us to learn more about how ProcessMAP fits into your priorities for 2019.

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Have You Connected Industrial IoT To Your Digital EHS Vision, Yet?

Have You Connected Industrial IoT To Your Digital EHS Vision, Yet?

Bottomline! The magic word that casts a long shadow on all of our business decisions, and yet there is never a point where we can say, “Ah! I don’t want any additional profitability”. In fact, one of the key drivers of tangible profitability – Employee Health & Safety – is increasingly stealing the spot light while simultaneously undergoing an unprecedented state-of-the-art transformation. This transformation is triggered by the realization of the potentially endless possibilities of connecting industrial IoT to robust and comprehensive safety management software.

During a recent National Association for Environmental Management (NAEM) Webinar, “How Smart Data Can Improve Safety and Bolster your Bottom Line” a panel of subject matter experts discussed how “Big Data” and “Smart Agents” could directly impact an organization’s bottom line (profitability).  A key defining moment during the panel discussion was when one of the senior executive safety stakeholders highlighted, in no uncertain terms, the absolute criticality and urgency of leveraging a trustworthy EHS management software to link real-time data with workplace safety and financial profitability.  Business and thought leaders across multiple industries have clearly prioritized future-state objectives with IoT in mind.  And while many safety stakeholders are still grappling with how to transition from reactive responses to proactive models, the webinar and its speakers delivered a very clear message – You have to act now if you don’t want to be left behind.

Digital EHS Vision

As it often happens with technological advancements, IoT has added unfamiliar vernacular to the daily dictionaries of safety professionals – IoT, Big Data, Smart Agents, Connected Workers, Connected Workplace, Intelligent Sensors, Operating technology (OT), and the list goes on.  Technology is rapidly evolving and industrial tools (machinery/ equipment) are now equipped with sensors that enable seamless, real-time data connectivity, thereby making such tools “Smart”.  This connectivity paves the path for safety professionals to leverage actionable data and digital transformations to drive business value, such as: 

  • Productivity is heightened
  • Production costs are reduced
  • Employee morale and loyalty is enhanced 

Furthermore, an employer’s investment in newer technology, facilitating employee-training and helping develop an advanced skill-set, accelerate the process of improving the bottomline.  

Of course, some might still wonder whether connecting tools, workers, systems, et.al to create a “Big-Data ecosystem” would result in a complicated operations model?  The answer is a resounding “Not at all!”. Let’s evaluate the common concerns in a highly simplified scenario: 

  • Will these connected “Smart” tools become effectively inoperable should an employee not have proper training?
  • What happens when the tool is altered, and/or some safeguards removed?
  • How will the tool behave in case it has exceeded use tolerances without proper Preventive Maintenance Inspections (PMI)? 

The reality is, “Smart” tools are highly capable of self-managing several key safety-related elements.  Such tools, connected to the industrial OT/IT infrastructure, can easily identify the need for additional training to be scheduled, or notify a supervisor to conduct PMI, and even identify an employee that incapacitated a key safeguard by sending an immediate notification.  Now incorporate highly capable analytics to support all areas of operations; productivity, training, equipment management, operator fitness –  the possibilities to improve your bottomline are potentially endless! And while this may have been a very simplistic scenario, what if your OT & IT could forecast human capital requirements, or raw material needs for high/low -demand periods?! With Internet as the backbone of a modern enterprise, connected systems are no longer a utopian future. Rather, it’s a critical reality that needs immediate attention from business leaders. For instance, consider the monumental advances and impact of wearable devices in the workplace.  According to an LNS Research blog“…wearable technology has been cited as bearing the greatest potential to improve the most important aspects of our collective well-being: the health of individual workers, the mitigation of safety hazards, and the reduction of harmful environmental impacts.”  Connected worker technology has significantly contributed to overall human capital safety.  

The EHS community has been bombarded with innovative technologies in the recent years.  Big Data is here and EHS stakeholders find themselves under tremendous pressure to digitize their current-state spreadsheet management approach.  An Occupational Safety Software is the perfect starting point.  It should be leveraged and adopted throughout the organization to provide a robust data management framework and depth.  One thing to keep in mind is that while IoT is still very much a work in progress, the first step for organizations is to tame and manage Big Data.  The collaboration of “Smart Agents” and the management of “Big Data” is fundamentally dependent on digitizing your current safety management system by implementing a highly scalable and comprehensive EHS software.  ProcessMAP’s safety software management systems provide an unmatched EHS platform to propel your business to the future of best-in-class functionalities.  Our Center of Excellence and Business Insight Support teams are always available to assist you in conceptualizing your IoT vision.  With the industry’s leading next-generation-solutions, ProcessMAP could be your trusted partner in boosting your bottomline by connecting your Big Data to actionable insights.  Contact ProcessMAP today to explore how your digital EHS solution may be the starting point to the realization of your IoT vision. 

Contributions (Quoted above): https://blog.lnsresearch.com/blog/bid/199852/4-Ways-Wearable-Tech-Will-Transform-EHS-Dynamics

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How To Prepare For An OSHA Inspection After The Weighting System Change

How To Prepare For An OSHA Inspection After The Weighting System Change

At the start of October 2019, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration implemented a new inspection weighting system in an effort to help workplaces better focus their resources to reduce worker fatalities, injuries and illnesses, according to an agency press release.

The new OSHA Weighting System has been used since the Fiscal Year 2020 start and officially replaced the agency’s previous program put into effect in 2015 called the Enforcement Weighting System. Under the old system, OSHA primarily weighed certain inspections based on the time taken to complete an inspection, and it certain cases, the impact of the inspection on workplace health and safety. The current OWS system will account for additional factors in an effort to improve workplace safety nationwide. The agency explained that OWS will foster the “appropriate allocation of resources” as a means of helping promote its balanced approach of safe and healthy workplaces. In particular, OSHA hopes that OWS will allow for it to create a management system that focuses enforcement activities on critical and strategic areas. To help the agency more proactively focus resources, its emphasis programs target workplaces or industries where it has been determined that the employees are “exposed to serious, uncontrolled hazards putting them at risk for injury or death,” according to an OSHA white paper.

“OWS will emphasize the use of both enforcement and compliance assistance in a way that allows OSHA to take a proactive approach to workplace safety and health rather than simply reacting to workplace incidents after they have happened,” the press release reads. “(OSHA) encourages employers to take a proactive approach to workplace safety and health by instituting management systems that identify and prevent hazardous conditions.”

How OSHA workplace inspections will be affected by OWS

inspection weighting system

Under OWS, workplace inspections will continue to be weighted, although they will be done based on  several new factors that include the “impact of the inspections and the agency’s priorities” as opposed to only a time-weighted standard. 

In addition, the new system “underscores the importance of complex enforcement activity” that pertains to what the agency considers to be the workplaces and operations with the most hazards. The new inspection system has been tested and conducted alongside EWS activities since Fiscal Year 2017, although the agency predicts workplace compliance assistance will be required in coming years.

According to an OSHA memo, inspections are grouped into several sections based on the “complexity” of the workplace hazards, which range from “high-priority” involving criminal cases (Group A) to those with hazards among the leading causes of on-the-job fatalities (Group C), including those related to falls or entrapment (“caught-in” hazards). In Group D, for example, the new policy calls for programmed inspections that follow an established enforcement policy for hazards listed as high priority and “somewhat time intensive,” like confined spaces, combustible dust and workplace violence. The weighting system also includes new enforcement initiatives that include site-specific targeting.

How your can prepare your workplace for an inspection

According to an Occupational Health and Safety Magazine article, the majority of OSHA inspections around the country yield at least one safety violation, which should prompt employers to identify as many as possible on their own and rectify them beforehand. The piece recommends several tips to help employers pass their next inspection:

  • Address workplace hazards: Due to the fact that the number and overall dangerousness of workplace hazards can add more weight to OSHA inspections with the FY 2020 change, employers should focus on the “Big Four” for injuries and fatalities: falls, electrocutions and “caught-in” and “struck by” hazards, per OHS. Along with routine internal inspections and employee oversight, safety management controls and systems can further reduce the amount of risk workers face on-site.
  • Comply with regulations: Even in lieu of an impending inspection, employers should always ensure that their properties, policies and procedures are in compliance with regulations pertaining to safety and communications, among other purposes. Compliance failure will always work against an employer when it comes to OSHA inspections.
  • Train employees: When it comes to ensuring that all of the pre-inspection tasks are completed, an employer must be sure that the employees charged with carrying them out are capable of doing so. Safety and health programs, for example, are only effective and cost-efficient if employees know how to follow specific guidelines. Another way to prepare for OSHA inspections is through intensive recordkeeping — a practice that employees should be familiar with.

When it comes to both meeting an OSHA inspection and keeping the workplace running safely and smoothly on a daily basis, the importance of setting in place the most comprehensive of solutions cannot be stressed enough.

At ProcessMAP, we help businesses of all sizes improve their workplace safety cultures and overall business acumen through our rich suite of EHS tools. Connect with us today to learn more about how our solutions can innovate your EHS operations.

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How EHS Technology Can Generate ROI On The Worksite

How EHS Technology Can Generate ROI On The Worksite

Well-crafted worksite safety programs can generate considerable ROI and actually contribute to the financial health of the organization. Workplace injuries remain common in the construction space, despite the advancement of environmental health and safety technologies and techniques.

Businesses in the sector reported 2.8 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses in 2017, the latest year for which data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics is available. More than 920 of these incidents resulted in death. Worse yet, analysts for the National Safety Council deemed the majority of these accidents preventable.

So, why are many builders failing to put into place seemingly essential precautionary measures into place via technology-driven safety initiatives? The answer: A perceived lack of return on investment.

Construction companies navigating the modern marketplace must prioritize spending, and EHS operations often land low on the fiscal totem pole. In reality, well-crafted worksite safety programs can generate considerable ROI and actually contribute to the financial health of the organization. Here are some examples.

Lower Compliance Costs

Adhering to Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations is neither easy nor inexpensive.

Construction firms set aside significant amounts of time for compliance-related activities, many of which center on manual processes. These critical exercises can drain cash coffers. Construction companies with formalized worksite safety programs based on cutting-edge EHS technology often dodge these costs by automating compliance-related administrative actions. This not only bolsters back-office productivity but also facilitates more responsive compliance operations, making it easier for the business to react to sudden regulatory shifts which unfold routinely.

Reduced Financial Penalties

EHS Tools for Worksites

OSHA noncompliance penalties increased in 2019. Now, the agency can distribute fines as high as $132,598, the new maximum penalty for a repeated or willful violation. Even a serious violation, the least pressing citation OSHA can deal out, comes with a fine of $13,260

These relatively small amounts can add up for both construction companies with razor-thin margins and those boasting relative financial security. 

EHS programs offer real ROI by decreasing the likelihood of worksite incidents that could result in regulatory action. With such initiatives in place, builders can effectively pinpoint and address hazards before they injure employees, thereby avoiding OSHA investigations, citations for noncompliance and the financial penalties that accompany them.

Improved Worker Productivity

Most businesses in the construction space are aware of the direct costs that materialize when an employee gets injured on the job. However, these expenses often pale in comparison to the amount firms surrender as a result of lost productivity, according to the NSC. The average construction company must get an extra $1,400 worth of work per active employee, per day to offset the cost of functioning with one man down, the organization found.

This is simply unsustainable for most builders, a vast majority of which are already dealing with staff shortages, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce reported.

Again, properly designed EHS programs directly address this common problem, allowing construction companies to maintain safe worksites, reduce worker injury rates and move forward, fully staffed.

These are just a handful of the ways that technology-driven EHS initiatives can generate ROI and lay the groundwork for financial success in the construction industry. Is your business looking to cultivate this sort of bottom line-building safety culture? We help construction firms of all sizes maintain safe and OSHA-compliant worksites via an innovative suite of EHS tools. Our software facilitates seamless data collection and analysis efforts while addressing ancillary issues such as regulatory compliance and profitability. Contact ProcessMAP today to learn how our solutions can help your EHS team generate ROI. 

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CTE Drives Safety With ProcessMAP IM Solution And SCAT Methodology

CTE Drives Safety With ProcessMAP IM Solution And SCAT Methodology

On a recent ProcessMAP EHS Leadership Roundtable, we heard from Dennis Seymour, Director of EHS for CTE (Carolina Tractor & Equipment Company). Since 1926, CTE has provided parts, service and sales of construction equipment, power generation, hydraulics, and on-highway trucks. A family-owned business, CTE is part of the Caterpillar dealer network, and operates 8 locations throughout Western North Carolina serving the following industries: Agriculture, Construction, Data Centers, Financial Services, Forestry, Governmental, Healthcare, Landfills, Landscaping, Manufacturing, On-highway Trucking, Paving, Quarries and Aggregates, and Waste. Dennis Seymour has worked as a safety professional for more than 20 years.  He also served in the United States Army for the past 32 years. During his final four years of services, Dennis worked in the Army Safety Center, which dates back to the 1950s. At the beginning, the safety center primarily focused on aircraft accidents. Since then, the center has totally transformed to be the Army Safety Center, which investigates incidents and educates more than 750,000 Army service members around the world who were focused on safety. 

During that time, Dennis became very familiar with a methodology for incident management known as SCAT, which stands for Systemic Cause Analysis Technique. SCAT looks at five predefined categories of loss events, starting with the loss and working backward to the event itself, and ending with causes and control measures to minimize the recurrence of the event. A SCAT diagram is created to outline the five categories.

They are:

  •         The Loss
  •         Type of Event
  •         Immediate Causes
  •         Basic Causes
  •         Actions to Prevent

There are several ways to evaluate the root cause of an incident, including the “5 Whys”, which is an iterative interrogative technique used to explore the cause-and-effect relationships underlying a particular problem. The primary goal of the technique is to determine the root cause of a problem by repeating the question “Why?”. Each answer forms the basis of the next question. The “five” in the name derives from an anecdotal observation on the number of iterations needed to resolve the problem. The Army also uses the “3 Ws” methodology, which stand for “What happened,” “Why it happened,” and “What are we going to do about it in the future.”

As the Director of EHS for CTE, Dennis continues to use the SCAT Methodology for incident investigation. One important component is to always have a timeline, which should include everything that took place on the day of the incident right up until the time it happened. He also recommends taking as many photos of an incident as possible, as they will be quite helpful in the investigation process for creating a record, as well as in a court of law. Availability of high resolution photos help to reduce uncertainty about reasons that potentially caused an incident. 

The CTE Safety Team always has an after-accident call to go through the SCAT Methodology and ask the questions, what happened, why did it happen and what CTE will do to prevent this type of incident in the future. No matter the size or scope of the incident, the team still goes through the same process for consistency and to be sure they are following the same protocol. The SCAT System looks at the loss event, it goes backwards to what happened leading to the event, it studies what caused the event, and then reviews control measures to minimize recurrence of the loss event.

Over the years since Dennis joined CTE, the safety team has refined its use of the SCAT Methodology and has worked to help change the company culture towards using this process for incident investigation to help get to the root cause of an incident. When the safety team uses the five categories of SCAT Methodology, it studies the loss or incident, the event that led to the incident, the immediate or direct causes of this incident, then it reviews the basic causes, and finally, the lack of control factor, or areas for corrective or preventive action. The SCAT Methodology uncovers areas that need to be fixed, but also the root causes of the incident itself.

ProcessMAP’s integrated incident management solution has played a key role in enabling the CTE safety team to bring the SCAT Methodology to life. ProcessMAP’s incident management solution helps safety teams to collect and normalize incident and investigation data in real-time and perform root-cause-analysis within the solution itself. The centralized EHS solution has streamlined more than 25 different spreadsheets that were in use within the organization. Spreadsheets are often prone to human or system errors, and can have a significantly negative impact on the outcome of an incident investigation. With ProcessMAP’s solutions, CTE is equipped to proactively identify and mitigate risks to minimize the number of safety incidents that impact the employees of the company. 

Of the 47 CAT dealerships in North America, CTE is number one in CAT North America in terms of total recordable incident rate. The business has lowered its auto incidents by 30 percent since implementing the SCAT Methodology.  It has also reduced property damage by 30 percent.  These reductions have positively impacted CTE’s bottom line and have made the company more profitable. 

To learn how ProcessMAP’s EHS solutions can help you streamline your incident management initiatives and minimize safety incidents within your organization, sign up for a free trial today! 

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Reduction Of Frequency Or Reduction Of Severity – Part 2

Reduction Of Frequency Or Reduction Of Severity – Part 2

In Part I of this 2-part series, we discussed commonly used strategies that may be used to target Reduction of Frequency.  Specifically; how health and safety management software has encouraged many organizations to refocus and rededicate their current-state EHS training management system.  Also, continuous improvement efforts have greatly enhanced traditional approaches with the digitization of behavior-based safety software applications.  All of these are significant contributors on the path of frequency reduction – but a focus on severity reduction may be approached in an entirely different manner.    

Reduction of severity is sometimes not immediately clear and may broaden as time goes by.  Severity, in a common application is simply used as a basic reference when discussing severe injuries that lead to unusually high medical costs.  However; given the far reaches of social media, Image or Brand-reputation damage is a very credible threat that could lead to loss of business opportunities and/or revenue; regulatory scrutiny and associated fines; and exorbitant legal costs.  I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the deep-reaching impact of a workplace fatality.  Remember that TRIR mentioned in Part I?  Well… now that comes into play and affects Workers Compensation insurance ratings and your Experience Modification Rate (EMR), which are used by insurance companies to gauge both past costs of injuries and future risk exposure.  The lower the EMR of your business, the lower your worker compensation insurance premiums may be based on lower risk.  Simply put – a business’ direct ability to earn revenue and its ability to operate at lower cost levels than its’ competitors are directly threatened!  From a business resilience perspective, this severity issue has gained the attention of the senior executives and must be the established priority of all efforts!  

safety management software

When an organization is confronted by higher insurance rates as direct result of risk exposure, efforts may lean towards Job Hazard Assessments.  A robust JHA software will provide a formal approach to job hazard identification, analysis, corrective actions, and risk ratings.  This is a tried-and-true technique that focuses on job tasks to identify hazards before they occur.  By focusing on the worker, the job task, the tools, and the work-environment relationship, proper work procedures are established.  This approach has proven to result in fewer worker injuries and illnesses; safer, more effective work methods; reduced workers’ compensation costs; and increased worker productivity.  Additionally, the analysis can be a valuable tool for training new employees in the steps required to perform their jobs safely.   

While frequency reduction or severity reductions may differ in approach and methods, they both will yield appreciated outcomes.  A common risk control adage calls attention to the fact that “frequency breeds severity”; basically – the more injuries/illnesses you have, the better chance that one soon will be severe in nature.  Remember to always involve your employees and encourage open communication as their input is critical in your organizations injury and illness prevention programs and safety-culture.  Here at ProcessMAP, we have dedicated 17+ years in designing an industry-leading safety and risk assessment software that can assist any organization in mitigating frequency or severity risk exposures.  Contact us today to learn more about our suite of products and how they can help keep your workers safe, no matter the goal.

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Comprehensive Apps For Shop Floor Safety

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Comprehensive Apps For Shop Floor Safety

As a business leader operating in the Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) sector, you might be searching for new methods of improving safety measures in the area where a lot of the action is taking place: on the shop floor. Perhaps you’re trying to decrease overhead costs associated with workplace injuries, or maybe you’d like to improve your organization’s compliance with OSHA’s standards.

According to a news release from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were approximately 2.8 million nonfatal workplace illnesses and injuries reported by private employers in 2017. This occurs at a rate of 2.8 cases for every 100 full-time workers. Another report from the BLS found that there were 5,147 workplace fatalities in 2017, at a rate of 3.6 per 100,000 full-time workers. Although these rates have gradually decreased over time, there’s no doubt organizations should revolutionize the safety of their work spaces.

One strategy many businesses have leveraged to improve their workplace safety culture is by incorporating digital tools on their shop floors. Rather than relying on pen and paper techniques, which make it difficult to record incidents in real time, organizations are using EHS apps to ensure their workers are conducting business safely. We’ve provided some applications that you might find most useful when you implement a comprehensive EHS software into your operations.

Pre-Start Safety Review (PSSR)

A properly conducted PSSR can actively prevent workplace incidents, worker injuries and damage to tools and equipment, while increasing productivity. As its name suggested, it works before various processes begin, operating proactively to ensure any new or altered procedures are safe before startup.

EHS Apps for Shop Floor Safety

What are some components of a high-functioning PSSR app? It should be able to assign and track action items from the moment they are assigned to the instance they are closed. Additionally, an effective PSSR allows for collaboration among and across teams, developing a multi-disciplined entity of workers partaking in the PSSR. This solution should be able to identify deficiencies in existing systems, offering recommendations to tailor activities to create optimal results. Finally, it should provide a single comprehensive interface that allows individuals to access and assess safety components with configurable, built-in checklists.

Logout/Tagout (LOTO) Permit

Permits are an essential component of LOTO programs that are set in place to make sure all equipment maintenance activity is being conducted safely. By utilizing a safe work permit system, organizations in the EHS space can significantly lower the prevalence of workplace injuries and fatalities resulting from accidental misuse of equipment and tools. A LOTO permit also provides workers with the measures they need to take before de-energizing various pieces of equipment, therefore ensuring that every person going through the LOTO process is doing so safely.

A high-quality LOTO app provides a transparent checklist that contains business rules and standards that match the organization’s specific LOTO program. Workers can use this technology to choose from predefined or company-specific controls to choose and communicate any precautions that should be taken into account, as well as any personal protection equipment (PPE) needed in a number of functions. They can also construct a Permit Review and Approval process, as well as a Closeout Authorization, to improve safety and compliance measures and standardize the process. Lastly and possibly most significantly, this app can produce consistency in all permit activities across the organization.

Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Audit

While the LOTO permit exists to put forth safety measures during the LOTO procedure, the LOTO audit ensures organizations are undergoing annual audits on each piece of machinery during the LOTO process. A high-quality LOTO Audit app can support businesses as they conduct inspections of their specific LOTO procedures and the knowledge of any authorized people involved. It can also assign corrective actions and manage them until the moment these action items are closed as a means of improving workplace compliance and safety.

Similar to the aforementioned apps, a LOTO Audit app provides a comprehensive checklist that is easily customizable to meet companies’ various needs and pain points. It serves as a one-stop solution to assess business’ procedural steps for the LOTO of equipment. This solution provides owners and deadlines of specific corrective actions and allow business leaders to track them from start to finish. Additionally, this technology allows workers to generate PDF reports that contain all required elements of the LOTO process to simplify the inspection process.

Machine Guarding Assessment (MGA)

An Machine Guarding Assessment app works primarily to help workers leverage machine guarding as a means of reducing the emergence of workplace injuries, identifying potential risks and coordinating corrective actions on situations that are currently hazardous. By encouraging the employee use of proper guarding, organizations can cut down on overall costs and decrease any down time that may occur as a result of ineffective guarding usage.

Like other EHS apps, an Machine Guarding Assessment offers a configurable checklist that encourages workers, supervisors and managers to evaluation the organization’s performance in the areas of compliance and risk mitigation. In addition, it provides transparent access to company procedures, industry standards and OSHA regulations to ensure all machines are being operated with proper guarding provisions.

With a comprehensive suite of EHS tools, your business can actively work to improve its safety regulations from the inside out. When your organization is ready to improve productivity, decrease overhead costs and revamp their workplace culture, be sure to look into an EHS platform that boasts these offerings.

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