Are Your Workplace Safety Practices Industry 4.0 Ready?

Are Your Workplace Safety Practices Industry 4.0 Ready?

Workplace Safety Practices

Businesses looking to roll out Industry 4.0-ready workflows must upgrade their workplace safety practices as well. How might EHS teams go about doing this?

Organizations across numerous sectors have embraced the next-generation shop-floor innovations associated with Industry 4.0. Investments in so-called digital transformation technologies are expected to surpass $1 trillion in 2018 alone, according to projections from the International Data Corporation.

This widespread implementation of data-driven enterprise technology could push the Industry 4.0 adoption rate to 72 percent by 2020, analysts for PricewaterhouseCoopers predict. Adopters will certainly experience significant benefits following installation as Industry 4.0 solutions can catalyze true operational transformation. However, these cutting-edge hardware and software assets can also create complications, especially for environmental health and safety teams.

Businesses looking to roll out Industry 4.0-ready workflows must upgrade their workplace safety practices as well. How might EHS teams go about doing this?

Understanding Available Technology

Industry 4.0 installations include numerous moving parts, including advanced hardware and software components. EHS teams intending to develop and deploy workplace safety programs to address these cutting-edge workflows must fully understand the technological components they include and the associated hazards, EHS Today reported.

For instance, businesses with extensive shipping and fulfillment operations have begun to adopt unmanned aerial vehicles, automated picking robots and other self-propelled assets designed to improve warehousing operations, according to The New York Times. While these items are configured to function without creating hazards, their presence alone complicates the workplace safety equation. Enterprises must therefore map out potential Industry 4.0 solutions and how they might change EHS operations.

Aligning Leadership and Staff

Simply forecasting EHS policy changes is not enough when it comes to addressing workplace safety complications stemming from Industry 4.0 technology. EHS teams must work with executives and staff to help them cope with change, EHS Today asserts.

Business leaders must have the overarching insight needed to influence and guide shop floor workers through the transition, while employees on the ground need access to the training materials with which they prepare for a new operational reality. EHS stakeholders that manage to support both of these groups can lay the groundwork for healthy Industry 4.0 safety cultures.

Embracing EHS Innovation

Production and warehousing operations are not the only functional areas that stand to benefit from Industry 4.0. technology. There are numerous next-generation solutions designed to streamline and strengthen EHS processes.

Enterprise technology innovators are currently developing EHS assets designed to pair with Industry 4.0 workflows, including web-connected clothing that can monitor workers’ vital signs and collect air quality readings in real time, according to the International Data Group. Businesses that truly want to amend their EHS protocols to mesh with Industry 4.0 operational assets must look into these advanced workplace safety technologies.

Here at ProcessMAP, we are helping organizations of all sizes prepare for Industry 4.0 via an innovative suite of EHS tools, which includes our leading mobile audit management software. Our solutions facilitate seamless data collection and analysis efforts while addressing ancillary issues such as regulatory compliance and profitability.

Connect with us today to learn how our solutions can future-proof your EHS program.

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Winning COVID-19 Blog 2: EBT Innovation – A Key Enabler For Employees To Return To Work

EBT Innovation - A Key Enabler For Employees To Return To Work

While companies around the world have grappled with the challenge of managing through the COVID-19 crisis, ProcessMAP Corporation, the industry leader in offering a data intelligence platform for employee Health and Safety, and Environmental Sustainability (EHS), has been conducting one of the largest EHS leadership roundtable – Winning COVID-19 with ProcessMAP  – on a weekly basis. 

As ProcessMAP customers make plans for returning employees to work, new safety concerns come into play.  With elevated body temperature being one of the most common symptoms of the novel coronavirus, being able to detect and monitor Elevated Body Temperature (EBT) in the workplace is one-way EHS professionals can help to prevent the spread of the virus within the workplace. Of concern are large throughput areas where people pass for entry into a work environment, e.g. airports, businesses, warehouses and factories, and the ability to detect EBT among these people.

EBT and ProcessMAP

One company working to address the need for EBT screening is ProcessMAP customer Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI), which operates in more than 200 countries with more than 105,000 employees worldwide. JCI offers a range of solutions that optimize building performance to improve safety, enhance comfort, and increase sustainability. 

During ProcessMAP’s roundtable, we heard from Ted Hall, who serves as the Global Program Manager for the Innovation Team at JCI. He and his team in the Center of Excellence Network are currently researching and testing EBT screening solutions to help their customers be able to bring their employees back to work and help them to stay healthy in their work environments.

The Innovation Team has evaluated more than 70 products to find the most effective, efficient tools to screen groups of people as they enter facilities. They have worked to ensure the products comply with the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) and are Food & Drug Administration (FDA) 510K approved. As guidelines change, the JCI Innovation Team has had to adapt their requirements accordingly. The JCI solution is expected to be available later in May. 

Thank you, Ted and the entire team at Johnson Controls, for your commitment to innovation, and to keep your own 105,000 employees and the employees of your customers safe and healthy.

The Winning COVID-19 with ProcessMAP weekly forum continues to bring together distinguished EHS leaders from Fortune 1000 companies, experts from the fields of public health, legal, and technology sectors to share effective strategies, best practices, and innovative solutions to minimize the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on employee safety and business operations. 

This blog is a part of a new series of curated content that ProcessMAP will be sharing with the larger EHS community. Watch this space for our next blog! To read our previous blog in this series, Click Here!

#StaySafe

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Winning COVID-19 Blog 3: The Emergence Of A Healthy Supply Chain

Winning COVID-19 Blog 3: The Emergence Of A Healthy Supply Chain

As companies worldwide look to bring their employees back to work following the COVID-19 crisis, ProcessMAP has been leading a weekly EHS leadership roundtable – Winning COVID-19 with ProcessMAP – to facilitate industry’s largest virtual gathering to  share effective strategies, best practices, and innovative solutions to help minimize the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on organizations. 

Focusing on supply chain is not new, but supply chain disruptions from the COVID-19 crisis have put an entirely new emphasis on suppliers’ organizational health and readiness. Companies have an increased need to gain visibility and assist wherever possible, especially the smaller suppliers who might have limited resources to deal with the COVID-19 crisis. Not only is it critical to understand the supplier’s ability to deliver essential parts and services, but also that they do this in a manner which mitigates the risk of spreading the virus through the supply chain. We have a front seat view on this topic.  

Dura Automotive and ProcessMAP

Recently, we heard from Jessica Jannaman, Global Director of EHS & Energy for Dura Automotive Systems, who shared her perspective regarding where exposure occurs in the supply chain and steps Dura is taking to minimize the risk of exposure. Because certain parts are made by other suppliers, Dura has identified three possible sources of exposure to COVID-19 in the supply chain:

  • Exposure at the supplier’s location
  • Exposure during transport
  • Exposure at the assembly line

Jessica shared that Dura Automotive will be deploying ProcessMAP’s Supply Chain Health Portal to provide a two-way communication platform allowing the company to gain visibility to the status of their suppliers’ compliance to precautions against the COVID-19 risks. Additionally, Dura Automotive will leverage the solution to share effective tools and best practices with their supply chain.

Dura Automotive recently completed a risk assessment within its supply chain and implemented the following measures:

  • Validate that required controls are in place at a supplier’s site by sharing Dura Automotive’s own safety playbook, and help the suppliers follow similar procedures
  • Protect employees from exposure by disinfecting parts that arrive at a site and providing appropriate PPE
  • Communicate to customers that required controls have been followed throughout the supply chain
  • Reduce the risk of a site shutdown, at both Dura Automotive’s location as well as any supplier, due to the spread of the COVID-19 disease

Furthermore, the company has also developed a Hierarchy of Controls for COVID-19, which looks at eliminating or avoiding exposure within its supply chain; substituting in-person meetings with virtual meetings where possible; implementing engineering controls such as physical guards to improve distancing and increase air circulation; implementing administrative controls such as social distancing and hand washing; and providing personal protective equipment (PPE) throughout its facilities.

As was evident from Jessica’s presentation, the role of EHS leaders continues to evolve in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic to include supporting supply chain leaders. Dura Automotive is co-innovating with ProcessMAP on deploying a Supply Chain Risk Management Portal to collaborate with its 4,000 suppliers and ensure that all relevant measures are implemented by the suppliers to eliminate the risk of exposure to the COVID-19 disease. 

This blog is a part of a new series of curated content that ProcessMAP will be sharing with the larger EHS community. Click Here to read the next blog in this series. To read our previous blog in this series, Click Here!

#StaySafe

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2019 Manufacturing Industry Trends To Watch For

2019 Manufacturing Industry Trends to Watch For

The present and future of the manufacturing industry are characterized by its constantly evolving technologies and practices. Over the years, innovations have yielded results in the forms of higher productivity, lower costs, saved time and improved safety cultures.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the manufacturing industry has experienced a steady decline in fatal injuries and illnesses in the workplace between 2015 and 2017, the last recorded year of information. There were 353 total recorded workplace fatalities in 2015, and 319 in 2016. In 2017, this number decreased to 303 total fatal illnesses and injuries, with 3.5 nonfatal cases per every 100 workers.

Although organizations operating in the Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) fields have the goal of eliminating the appearance of incidents and close calls altogether, it’s important to investigate how business leaders have managed to lower these numbers over the years and decades and how they plan on making their spaces risk-free.

Here are some of the top trends impacting the manufacturing industry in 2019:

2019 Manufacturing Industry Trends

Cultures of Innovation and Progress

According to PricewaterhouseCoopers, one of the major trends industrial manufacturing organizations should heed to is the push for a workplace culture that is built on improvement and progress. Because technology has progressively guided the functions of manufacturing companies around the world, employers should encourage their workers to embrace change and innovation, as they are often the recipe for progress. In addition, they should keep their workforces up to date on the latest technology and market trends to produce high-level results.

To adequately build a culture of improvement and cutting-edge thinking, business leaders may need to invest in their employees’ professional development. This involves promoting education and training programs that cater to a company’s specific needs and problem areas. Although it involves some upfront costs, this practice can yield effective results, as workers transform into skilled experts who are able to complete their work more efficiently. These capable teams will be more likely to solve problems proactively and develop new techniques to complete tasks in systematic and strategic ways.

Growth of IoT 

The internet of things (IoT) is not new in the manufacturing sector. The integration of sensors and intelligent devices in our everyday equipment has been one of the most transformative changes our industry has seen in years. Its advances have evolved our supply chains into data-driven, insightful sites of efficiency. And the development and implementation of IoT is nowhere near complete. In upcoming years, the industry’s emphasis and reliance on IoT functionality is projected to grow exponentially.

Many of today’s manufacturing tools are currently equipped with IoT-based technologies and have resulted in increased productivity, saved time and lower chance of risks. This success has prompted many manufacturing business leaders to invest even more money into this equipment to produce better customer experiences and develop lasting relationships with end users.

Artificial Intelligence

As many industries have adopted AI in their day-to-day functions, the increase in AI presence in the manufacturing sector shouldn’t catch us off-guard. Some ways businesses will begin and continue to introduce AI into their work spaces are through the use of robotics, automation and — as previously mentioned — IoT tools. With a greater emphasis of tools doing the tough labor, personnel operating in the EHS landscape should feel unburdened.

Something that’s worth bringing up is the notion that many workers have a fear of AI taking over human jobs. As you adopt AI in your own workplace, don’t be alarmed if you experience backlash for this very reason. It’s worth knowing and communicating with your staff that in the present and near future, AI will simply serve as a vehicle for efficiency that complements human productivity.

The Push for the Risk-free Workplace

As businesses are pushing for progress and profitability, there’s one area that remains stagnant until it’s given particular attention: workplace safety. No matter how strong an organization’s corporate culture is or how advanced IoT and AI capabilities are, these factors cannot mitigate the damages inflicted after a business faces a serious accident.

To combat the high costs and risks associated with workplace injuries and close calls, transforming into a risk-free site, businesses have adopted Environmental, Health and Safety software. These platforms provide a transparent interface on which employees, managers and executives can locate hazards and report them in real time to ensure they find a solution to the issue before the danger persists or escalates. In addition, EHS technologies offer insightful training programs to educate workers on how to approach certain tools and functions in the most safe and effective ways. Increased transparency and education across the workplace can drastically reduce the appearance of incidents on the manufacturing front, in turn improving a business’s productivity and ensuring they are up to date on industry-specific compliance standards.

ProcessMAP provides the right EHS tools for manufacturing businesses that want to improve their overall bottom line while improving their workplace safety cultures. Connect with us to find out how you can stay innovative and competitive in the manufacturing sector by working to become an accident-free site.

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Have You Personalized Your EHSQ Solution Yet?

Have You Personalized Your EHSQ Solution Yet?

You might have implemented an Environmental Health Safety and Quality (EHSQ) solution in your workplace. However, this software isn’t nearly as impactful when it is not personalized to meet your specific business goals.

Here are some of the ways you can effectively customize your EHSQ platform to meet your business’ individualized workplace safety regulations and industry-wide compliance measures.

To be the best at what we do, it’s important that we look at the industry as a whole, taking into account advancements in technologies and priorities. Here are some of the major EHS trends and insights of 2019 thus far:

Role-specific solutions

When you’re in the process of introducing EHSQ software into your operation space, you will want to make sure the right information is accessible to the right workers. Even though it can be helpful for your employees to have the ability to view all-encompassing workplace safety practices, it is essential that they have immediate access to EHS policies that match their own job description. Personalizing your EHSQ system’s mobile strategy can help make sure your employees have the right information for their role exactly when they need it.

Specific risk assessment tools

EHSQ solution

Using risk assessment software allows business leaders to document and assess various tasks, seeing how the organization has worked to improve safety regulations to prevent workplace risks and hazards. 

When businesses report potential issues before an accident occurs, they can take preventative action to keep it from happening.

When you implement an EHSQ solution into your operations processes, make sure you input personalized information to ensure you are meeting safety and compliance standards. There may be specific safety risks your staff should be attentive to depending on your industry or the types of equipment you use in your operating space. Personalized risk assessment can ensure that you are meeting the necessary standards to keep your staff safe and prevent your business from incurring any fines or penalties resulting from noncompliance.

Tailored training options

There’s no doubt that EHSQ solutions add value to your organization. However, your business is missing out on a variety of features when it does not personalize this software to cater to your industry and goals. One of the major ways you can gain the most value from your EHSQ system is by taking advantage of any custom-made training options.

At the end of the day, it’s important you implement an EHSQ platform that provides your business with a tailored training program that can streamline your operations and ensure compliance.

If you’re looking to implement an immersive, impactful EHSQ solution into your workplace, consider ProcessMAP’s broad range of Environmental Health Safety and Quality tools. Contact us today to learn more about how a personalized EHSQ solution can improve your business’ safety culture and overall strategy.

Schedule a demo today to see exactly how ProcessMAP’s capabilities can accommodate your constantly evolving health and safety concerns.

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ROI (Return On Investment) Of Corporate Sustainability

ROI (Return On Investment) Of Corporate Sustainability

At a recent alumni meeting at my college, I overheard someone say “the sole purpose of a company is to generate returns for its shareholders, so why should I invest in sustainability decreasing my profit and thus the return of my shareholders”.

Although sustainable development is primarily related to protecting  the environment and environmental concerns in general, it’s also integrally tied to financial sustainability. Equal emphasis is given to profit in triple bottom-line accounting known as People, Planet, and Profit (PPP). Increasing popularity of sustainable development is not a fad that will pass in due course of time; there is a positive return on investment associated with Sustainability.

There are tangible and intangible benefits resulting from corporate sustainability which ultimately result in upward trending financial performance. A few tangible and intangible benefits are listed below.

Regulatory Compliance:

Compliant organization results in less fines and penalties. For instance, a company which treats waste water within its boundaries in accordance with local regulations avoids fines imposed as opposed to company which hasn’t invested in a water treatment plant.

Eco-efficiency:

Create more while using less resources by increasing recyclability and optimizing processes. Because the resources are put to maximum use and wastage is reduced, it translates to improved financial performance.

Competitive edge:

Companies like Dell and Walmart are choosing their supply chain partners based on sustainability performance and companies with improved performance have an edge.

Risk Management:

Companies which have taken stock of their social and environmental risk are better placed in regards to long term sustainability. Thus they have managed their future risk better.

Attracting Private Equity:

Sustainable investments are on the rise and investors want to put their money in firms which have better assessed their ESG performance and would deliver healthy returns.

Enhanced Brand Image:

As consumer awareness is growing, they are increasingly mindful of company’s effects on the environment and are ready to shift loyalties in case of company being detrimental to society’s larger interests. The Ernst & Young Report on corporate sustainability trends shows enquiries from investors and shareholders are on the rise.

Employee retention:

Employees want to work for ethical companies which take efforts in reducing their footprint and engage in sustainable practices.

The research conducted on financial returns of Corporates investing in Sustainable practices also suggests the same. A Harvard Business Review Blog analyses investment returns of resource efficient companies against other companies. Companies investing in Sustainability, energy efficiency and innovation have posted significantly better numbers. 

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Four Great Options For Your EHS New Year’s Resolution

Four Great Options For Your EHS New Year's Resolution

The end of a year is a time for companies to reflect, review and, inevitably, make business-orientated resolutions for the next 12 months. Irrespective of the size of an organization, the roadmap for 2018 will have been planned, with the expectation being that stated goals will not only be achieved before the end of 2018, but also contribute to a healthy bottom line.

Nonfatal workplace injuries decline

Financial goals aside, companies should be making certain that their working conditions for employees are safe and free from hazards. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. employers reported 2.9 million non-fatal workplace injuries in 2016, a drop of 48,500 from the previous year. And while the number of non fatal incidents continued to show a year-on-year decline, there was a 7 percent increase in work-related deaths with 5,190 fatalities flagged over those 12 months.

“America’s workers deserve better.”

“The occupational fatality data show a tragic trend with the third consecutive increase in worker fatalities in 2016—the highest since 2008,” said OSHA’s Deputy Assistant Secretary Loren Sweatt, in a press release. “America’s workers deserve better. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is committed to finding new and innovative ways of working with employers and employees to improve workplace safety and health. OSHA will work to address these trends through enforcement, compliance assistance, education and training, and outreach.”

Sweatt’s concerns are well-founded and should be considered a catalyst for companies to take another look at their workplace safety protocols. As a result, companies can take advantage of the fresh start that a new year brings by either auditing or upgrading their health and safety software. 

ProcessMAP

Health and safety should be a new year priority

New year, same commitment to workplace safety

With the above in mind, here are four New Year’s resolutions that will help make a working environment less hazardous for employees:

  1. Inform and educate your workforce by making certain that people are aware that there are four types of hazard: physical, biological, chemical and ergonomic. The first three are easy enough to explain, but workers may not realize that ergonomic hazards put a strain on the body and can damage the musculoskeletal system. A repetitive strain injury, for example, can be extremely easy to achieve, especially for those people who spend a lot of time typing or have poor posture from being desk-bound.
  2. Prevention is better than the cure. In other words, reduce the chances of people suffering from a workplace hazard that can be easy to fix. For example, if a working environment has a high level of noise, make certain that ear protection is up to the job. Noise-cancelling headphones are readily available in the consumer market, so there is no real excuse for companies to not provide workers with adequate protection.
  3. Adopt a zero-tolerance attitude to workplace safety. Granted, some working environments have the capacity to be more hazardous than others, but if hazards are more prevalent in a particular workplace, then a company should make an increased effort to ensure that it doesn’t get cited by OSHA for ignoring a common hazard. Take fall protection, for instance. This hazard has been at the top of the OSHA list of safety violations for three years. The same goes for hazards such as spills, tripping and electricity. If a worker sees something amiss, he or she should be encouraged to say something, and that encouragement has to come from the top.
  4. Don’t discount the short- and long-term effects on a worker that are caused by preventable workplace issues. People spend the much of their time at work, so they should not have to become stressed or mentally affected by hazards like extreme workload demands, sexual harassment, a lack of respect or even inadequate social support. In other words, workers have a right to know that management will have their backs if needed. In addition, companies should make every effort to ensure that the work-life balance is not skewed heavily toward the work element.

Companies that want to address workplace hazards and risks should check out ProcessMAP’s health and safety software. Our solutions suite has allowed organizations to streamline their health and safety protocols and reduce the potential for OSHA citations. Contact us today to learn more and schedule a free demo.

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3 Ways Compliance Auditing Software Can Pay For Itself

3 Ways Compliance Auditing Software Can Pay For Itself

Businesses embarking on environmental health and safety improvement activities sometimes balk at the notion of implementing new backend tools, such as compliance auditing software, that catalyze EHS growth. Installation can require considerable time and corporate resources. In the end, EHS stakeholders are reluctant to commit to these expenditures in fear of implementing solutions that generate paltry return on investment. However, powerful, well-tested compliance auditing solutions like the one we produce at ProcessMAP can reliably deliver optimal ROI, ultimately paying for themselves not long after the implementation process has concluded. How?

Here are three ways quality compliance auditing software pays for itself:

Reducing corrective action costs

In 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration distributed more than 58,700 violations, according to internal records. The organizations on the receiving-end of these infractions likely incurred extensive penalties of tens of thousands or more. In addition to noncompliance fines, probably dealt with the costs of corrective action. Businesses evaluating EHS compliance activities often forget about expenses in the latter category, which can become substantial in the event that safety issues are rampant. Simply avoiding corrective action is not a viable option. OSHA assesses a financial penalty of $12,675 per first-time violation. That figure increases to $126,749 per violation for repeat offenders.

In the end, corrective action costs are necessary. Compliance auditing solutions such as the ProcessMAP product help reduce these expenses by allowing organizations to estimate the cost of corrective action before work commences. This capability makes it easier to responsibly take corrective action and reduces the likelihood of immensely expensive repeat violation penalties.

“Compliance auditing solutions help reduce expenses by preemptively estimating the cost of corrective action.”

Addressing training-related expenses

Employee training is the most effective solution for addressing workplace safety deficiencies. When employees understand how to navigate their work environments safely, they can easily pinpoint hazards in need of mitigation and avoid behaviors that may lead to injury or death. This awareness, in turn, eliminates the costs that come with noncompliance or accident cleanup. However, many enterprise fail to provide workers with the instruction they need to stay safe on the job, according to research from the National Safety Council. Earlier this year, the nonprofit group surveyed 2,000 U.S. workers from more than a dozen different industries and found that over 30 percent respondents felt that the on-the-job safety training they received was inadequate.

Compliance auditing software comes equipped with training management components that ease employee instruction, leveraging sophisticated online tools to drive effective employee training programs that lead to safer workplaces and lower costs associated with noncompliance and event mitigation.

compliance auditing software

Proper training is essential for work safety.

Supporting effective permit management

Businesses operating in the construction and industrial spaces must obtain permits before starting work, an arduous process that most operational personnel dread. That said, obtaining official signoff from local, state and federal officials is absolutely essential, as firms that begin projects prior to receiving confirmation from these parties often suffer costly shutdowns and fines. For example, the state of Florida assesses financial penalties as large as $2,000 per permit-based violation, according to The Florida Legislature.

EHS backend tools like compliance auditing software ease the permit acquisition and management process via advanced tracking modules that leverage automated features to keep operational leaders informed as they prepare for project launch. This capability ensures compliance, reducing the likelihood of permit-related fines.

Is your organization prepared to implement compliance auditing software capable of paying for itself as outlined above? Connect with ProcessMAP today. We help businesses maintain effective EHS activities by providing cutting-edge Environmental Health and Safety Software. EHS stakeholders at major firms such as Cardinal Health and Goodyear leverage our solutions to keep workers safe and achieve compliance. Contact us to learn more or schedule a demo

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OSHA’S Top Priority: I2P2.

OSHA’S Top Priority: I2P2.

Are You Ready?

The I2P2 Injury and Illness Prevention Program has been in OSHA’s agenda since April 2010. OSHA, along with the ASSE, recently published a white paper urging President Obama to advance I2P2 and praised the possibility of making it a regulatory requirement in the near future.

What to expect from I2P2?

I2P2 is a proactive process to help employers find and fix workplace hazards before workers get injured. It can help reduce workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities, improve safety culture, and increase productivity while reducing turnover and costs. OSHA proposes the program with following six elements:

  1. Management Leadership
  2. Worker Participation
  3. Hazard Identification and Assessment
  4. Hazard Prevention and Control
  5. Education and Training
  6. Program Evaluation and Improvement

Why do you need I2P2?

OSHA believes that adoption of injury and illness prevention programs based on simple, sound, and proven principles will help millions of U.S. businesses improve their regulatory compliancedecrease the incidence of workplace injuries and illnesses, reduce costs (including significant reductions in workers’ compensation premiums) and enhance their overall business operations.

What you need to do?

If you have an existing injury and illness prevention plan in your company, you just need to review it as per the OSHA. If not, start gearing up before the enforcement is passed by following these 5 tips: 

  1. Standardize an effective Hazard Assessment System for your business and identify the areas within your company which bear high operational risks.
  2. Set up goals for your injury and illness prevention program.
  3. Formulate programs to lower operational risks and achieve the set goals.
  4. Ensure that employees are trained for implementing the program.
  5. Once implemented, regularly inspect and evaluate the program.

Conclusions

Despite the combined efforts of employers, workers, unions, safety professionals and regulators, more than 4,500 workers lose their lives and more than four million are seriously injured each year. Tens of thousands more die or are incapacitated because of occupational illnesses including many types of cancer and lung disease. The human toll from this loss is incalculable and the economic toll is enormous.

  • Many employers in the U.S. have been slow to adopt a workplace “safety culture” that emphasizes planning and carrying out work in the safest way possible.
  • Injury and illness prevention programs are based on proven managerial concepts that have been widely used in industry to bring about improvements in quality, environment and safety, and health performance.
  • Effective injury and illness prevention programs emphasize top-level ownership of the program, participation by employees, and a “find and fix” approach to workplace hazards.Injury and illness prevention programs need not be resource-intensive and can be adapted to meet the needs of any size organization.

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Are You Protecting Your Temporary Workers? Learn More

Are You Protecting Your Temporary Workers? Learn More

Fatal work injuries involving contractors accounted for 12 percent or 542 of the 4,693 fatal work injuries reported in 2011 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recently, there have been numerous fatalities involving temporary workers their first day on the job. Davis, a 20 year old contract worker at Bacardi Bottling plant was crushed by a palletizer machine as he was not trained on the lock-out and tag-out procedure.

Considering such cases, OSHA released a memorandum for Protecting the Safety and Health of Temporary Workers. Under this memo, Regional CSHO’s would focus on temporary workers at a site and whether they are exposed to a volatile condition.
Temporary Workers
For the purposes of gathering this information, “temporary worker” includes those who are working under a host employer/staffing agency employment structure. They would then assess if these workers have received the required training in a language and vocabulary they understand. In the case of any deviation, they would use a new OSHA Information System (OIS) Code – “TEMPWORKERS”. Other information captured would be name of the temporary workers’ staffing agency, the agency’s location, and the supervising structure under which the temporary workers are reporting (i.e., the extent to which the temporary workers are being supervised on a day-to-day basis either by the host employer or the staffing agency).
 

What OSHA expects from you?

Thus, OSHA is concerned about temporary employee’s training and the manner in which work is done. It does not require employers to pay compensation benefits, but they are certainly responsible for temporary worker safety as they are for your own employees. All temporary staff should be provided with adequate Personal Protective Equipment as needed on the job. Additionally, employers must log all injuries sustained by temporary workers on your OSHA 300 log.

Under the Multi-Employer Work site Policy, the act creates two types of obligations:

(1) A “general duty” obligation running only to the employer’s own employees; and

(2) An obligation to obey all OSHA standards with respect to all employees, regardless of their employer.

Thus, with the economy continuing to be slow and employers trying to evade workers’ compensation, higher wages, union drives and the duty to ensure that their workers are citizens or legal immigrants; the number of temporary workers have been spiraling up over the years. In this scenario, employers need to insure a few action points:

  1. Coordinate with Temporary agencies to provide PPE and training, verifying results.
  2. Identify areas of training that need additional emphasis.
  3. Insure Temporary employees have PPE and knowledge required to perform the tasks given.
  4. Treat temporary employees the same as your employees by providing the same level of safety training. 

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From Silo To Synergy: New Frontiers In Risk And EHS Collaboration

From Silo To Synergy: New Frontiers In Risk And EHS Collaboration

The world is going digital—yet many companies aren’t when it comes to safety. While machines, methods and processes have evolved, risk and safety management has more or less stayed the same. It may have made sense a decade ago to silo risk and safety functions, but in today’s environment, neglecting collaboration can hinder business performance and profitability.
EHS Collaboration

The risks of siloed enterprise risk functions

There are often two distinct ways in which organizations find themselves lagging behind the competition when it comes to their safety performance—a siloed risk function and outdated methods of interpreting threats.

Unfortunately, siloing risk and safety management has caused leaders to overlook much larger, systemic issues. This idea proliferates due to the fact that many companies still log accidents by hand on paper, and then upload those documents into a manually operated spreadsheet. This outdated process inhibits being able to identify key trends that allow decision makers to mitigate workplace accidents determine root cause and contributing factors, and decrease insurance claims costs.

According to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration, businesses spend roughly $1 billion per week on workers’ compensation costs. This money is effectively lost revenue, and much of it could be prevented if safety and risk managers bridged the gap between what happened and why it happened.

When it comes to workplace safety, risk management and safety cultures have much in common. Both have a goal of rooting out typical sources of danger in an effort to prevent them from occurring in the future. Without taking an analytical approach to workplace safety, however, it’s highly unlikely the dots will connect for safety managers who constantly find themselves amid stacks of papers flowing out of cabinets or infrequently updated spreadsheets.

Key takeaway: Spreadsheets and paper form submissions are outdated and often silo key statistics, leaving many companies in the dark about their safety habits.

EHS software provides a digital platform for submitting and reviewing incident reports.

Modernizing enterprise risk management

Correlation of previously siloed injury, demographic, and claims statistics ultimately results in better insight into why certain injuries become the norm. 

“EHS software helps reduce worker compensation costs.”

EHS software allows companies to connect every part of the process. It begins with digital injury report form submission, which the software then archives as a number of different data points. After months of tracking, organizations are able to gain insight into why, for example, a frighteningly large amount of machine guarding injuries occur, as opposed to a smaller number of slips and falls, and what should take priority in prevention. It would also provide the help necessary to truly reduce the overall cost of workplace injuries.

This behavior-based, action-driven approach to preventing future accidents from occurring is near impossible to institute through conventional methods of injury record keeping. Companies yield excellent returns after overhauling their safety programs, as well. According to the American Society of Safety Engineers, after a coal mining company in West Virginia incorporated EHS software, its worker compensation cost per every $100 on the payroll was just $1.28, while competitors reported spending as much as $13.78. This reduction in expense could be found because the coal company was able to understand which practices resulted in the most injuries, fines or accidents and then actively worked to prevent them, rather than just logging them and moving on with the day.

Key takeaway: Siloing risk and safety functions will ultimately hurt a company in the long-run, as it won’t have the ability to look at workplace injuries in retrospect and find a root cause for their emergence, among other key figures. Outdated safety methods only contribute to this separation, and businesses that embrace collaboration moving forward will reap the most rewards.

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