Preventing Avoidable Workplace Incidents In The Automotive Industry

Preventing Avoidable Workplace Incidents In The Automotive Industry

Every day, a mechanic should arrive at work focused on how he’ll piece together an engine after repairing the flywheel rather than the dangers that come with the endeavor.

Mechanics and manufacturing employees are tasked with some of the most daunting repairs that stretch them to not only their limits mentally, but physically as well. With thousands of pounds of metal hanging above workers, sharp tools in use and repetitive motions a mainstay technique, it’s clear more safety and precaution is needed to prevent some of the more foreseeable incidents.

Lowdown on the automotive industry

Workplace Incidents

Automation has largely made workplaces safer, though automobile manufacturing in particular still produces considerably high injury rates. Nine out of every 100 workers specializing in body and trailer manufacturing suffered injuries in 2010, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. Roughly 6 out of every 100 full-time employees were hurt in general vehicle assembly jobs in the same year, while 5 in every 100 concentrating on part-creation experienced the same fate. Moreover, 3 in every 100 incidents occur during repairs.

While these numbers may not look that high on the surface, they are mostly unnecessary risks. Repetitive motion and overexertion represent a large portion of these workers’ compensation claims, and even being struck by an object is unusually high on the list for an industry so keyed in on computerized processes.

The real risks in the industry lie within the nature of the job itself, according to the International Labour Organization. A car jack malfunctions and whomever is underneath is injured; an employee lugs a heavy vehicle part across the warehouse, only to wake up with a strained back muscle the next day. Some may see these instances as unavoidable, but the truth is that clever planning and better granular insight into daily operations can lead to a far safer workplace.

Finding the risks

Reducing on-site accidents is no easy feat—it requires transparency into the data gathered by safety managers and data analysis after that. The ILO highlighted the common types of threats employees face daily:

  • Accidental
    • Falls from ladders or higher levels.
    • Injuries resulting from equipment malfunctions or routine tasks.
  • Physical
    • Listening to loud noises over 90 a-weighted decibels for extended periods of time.
    • Damage suffered from welding or radiation techniques.
    • Working in extreme hot or cold temperatures.
  • Chemical
    • Exposure to fumes from exhaust, cleaning materials, adhesives, etc., through lung or skin contact.
    • Touching or ingesting corrosive or toxic materials.
  • Musculoskeletal
    • Strains, ligament tears and other internal bodily harm resulting from repetitive motion or overexertion.

Targeted efforts should be made to oversee potential hazards in these four specific areas. Furthermore, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago found 71 percent of all workers in automotive manufacturing have suffered an injury at one point in time. But the authors suggested the BLS could be undershooting its own data on workplace injuries in the sector as some companies pay out of pocket for employees’ injuries, as well as the workers’ compensation on top of that, which skews the numbers considerably.

When it’s all said and done, it’s not a far stretch to say the job that served as the backbone of the American economy for a lengthy stretch of time is one of the most dangerous occupations a person can have

Building a preventative safety culture​

“Training can help employees diagnose dangerous situations.”

The ILO reported that simple preventative measures, like providing gloves for employees working with chemicals or putting up rail guards in certain parts of the facility, can help prevent incidents. But perhaps the organization’s most important advice is to educate workers on how to identify injury-prone situations before they occur.

Training is best done through a safety manager delivering sessions not only to teach proper safety habits, but also to help workers pinpoint unsafe actions and other clues that suggest an accident will take place. By gaining granular insight into actionable internal data, safety managers can properly structure lessons to better equip employees to practice safe habits.

Moving forward, organizations can use injury reports not only to reduce quantity, but also to improve upon the costs the company incurs due to preventable accidents. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration estimated businesses lose up to $60 billion per year through productivity downtime caused by workplace injuries, which means devoting time to understanding and adopting a preventative safety culture is not just the right thing to do—it also makes business sense.

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What Role Will The IoT Play In Transportation And Logistics Safety?

What Role Will The IoT Play In Transportation And Logistics Safety?

Transportation and Logistics

What do a warehouse employee, driver and retail store have in common? They’re all connected by the Internet of Things—a technology taking over and revolutionizing transportation and logistics.

What do a warehouse employee, a driver and a retail store all have in common?

They’re all connected by the Internet of Things—a technology taking over and revolutionizing transportation and logistics. Through embedded sensors and smarter technology, the industry is on the verge of reinventing itself.

IoT gives logistics a boost

There’s been a steadily growing change in the transportation and logistics industry over the past decade, according to Read Write. Budgets for the sector are shrinking, and logistics managers are being increasingly relied on to improve profits with fewer resources than they’ve had before at their disposal. In the same sphere, corporate reliance on big data has skyrocketed. It was only a matter of time before the two came together to form the perfect match.

“IoT intertwines perfectly with transportation and logistics.”

IoT applications offer interconnectivity between previously incommunicable objects, like trucks or pallets, through the use of sensors and other types of devices. These sensors track everything from movement to the speed in which an action is completed.

SupplyChain24/7 reported a lot of the benefits derived from routine implementation of IoT involve reduced overhead or increased productivity. But underneath it all are improved safety methods that can extend across the workforce.

Key takeaway: IoT is already prevalent in the industry, which lays the fundamental infrastructure needed to improve safety by leveraging big data.

Worker safety reimagined

Real-time transparency into fleet management and asset management offers more than a bird’s eye view into how errant behavior impacts operations. SupplyChain24/7 reported the use of Radio Frequency Identification Tags (RFID) allows logistics managers to track areas prone to accidents—such as the warehouse and yard. This is a sector of the industry where humans meet machinery, and coordination of the two is key to keeping people safe.

An article by the Deloitte University Press posited this data-rich industry will expand its use of IoT to realign its infrastructure. But this “Information Value Loop,” as the source dubbed it, can facilitate a discussion about how these devices promote adherence to safety standards:

  • Action creates data, which devices communicate to each other and send to a machine that aggregates the raw figures.
  • Safety and facility managers analyze the collected information.
  • This insight can then guide changes to future actions and methods.

Key takeaway: Big data is primarily used to track movement, which can help safety managers understand high-risk areas of operation and develop new safety methods to keep workers out of harm’s way.

IoT allows for interconnectivity between different parts of the shipping and logistics process.

Making a change today

Data isn’t useful to a safety manager unless he or she knows what to do with it. IoT is often mentioned with the phrase, “actionable insights,” but what does that really mean? In essence, by understanding common areas of injury within the transportation and logistics industry, safety managers can develop new ways to prevent accidents.

How? First, it’s important to know where some run-of-the-mill workplace incidents occur:

  • Talking Logistics reported the usual on-the-road accidents involve distracted driving from either the trucker’s end or another driver. Injuries originating from entering and exiting the cab are frequent off-the-road hazards.
  • Inside a warehouse or yard, powered industrial truck misuse or the machine guarding absence are both on OSHA’s top 10 most cited safety standards and are good metrics to track.

Next, you’ll want to gather a large sample size indicating average traffic patterns, the number of interactions per injury or other key statistics RFID lends itself well to. For example, you can track forklifts to understand the routes they’ll most likely take during hours when foot traffic in the yard or warehouse is high. Then, it’s simply a matter of zeroing in on whether to adjust these patterns for the forklifts or restructure the layout of the warehouse to ensure employees won’t accidentally get in the way.

Accounting for driver safety on the road is a little more difficult but still manageable. According to CIO.com, the New Jersey Turnpike Authority is installing over 3,000 devices along the route to help improve driver safety and emergency response times. In the same sense, transportation and logistics companies should look to leverage the interconnectivity of GPS, regional traffic patterns and other potential hazards in an effort to automatically update the driver’s GPS with the most efficient route.

Key takeawayData analysis allows safety managers to better focus their time and resources on preventing accidents.

IoT and the transportation and logistics industries are becoming more intertwined than ever—how does your company plan on using data to make a safer workplace? Leave a comment below to let us know.

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Workplace Ergonomics: Why Is It Really Important?

Workplace Ergonomics: Why Is It Really Important?

Ergonomic Injury is like slow poison – It affects your body over a period often making it incurable.

Why should an Organization perform an Ergonomic Assessment?

(Source: OSHA 2012 Report for US based Industries)

  1. Nearly 33% of injuries occur due to Ergonomics
  2. High cost of Insurance
  3. Average Cost of Injury: $12000/ person
  4. Average Cost of Surgery: $43000/ person
  5. OSHA is trying hard to include regulations pertaining to Ergonomics in OSHA 300 form since 2010

What are the inherent cost heads due to Ergonomic Injury?

  1. Workers Compensation Cost
  2. Additional Wages – for those filling in for injured workers
  3. Lost Productivity – due to absent or Restricted workers
  4. Absenteeism – for workers who do not file a claim
  5. Quality problems – new workers may not be as efficient as the experienced ones
  6. Overtime and temporary workers
  7. Probable loss of customers due to late market entry or sub-standard product output

Step to improve the Ergonomics of your facility is to identify and prioritize the departments and jobs that need to be evaluated for Ergonomics. This priority can be based on the following:

  1. Initial Audit of the Workplace – A quick facility tour will give you an idea as to which jobs or departments are demanding in nature and which are less demanding ones. Based on this, priority can be identified
  2. Employee Survey – A survey of employees across all departments will give an idea of the level of safety in departments and this can be one deciding factor.
  3. Past Records – History of injury information from OSHA logs, safety and medical records, insurance, and other information sources can be analyzed to help identify trends and departments or jobs with risk factors that may be contributing to injuries.

More on Ergonomics coming your way…..

Ergonomics can be defined simply as the study of work. More specifically, ergonomics is the science of designing the job to fit the worker, rather than physically forcing the worker’s body to fit the job.

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Monitoring Global Carbon Intensity And Policy Implications

Monitoring Global Carbon Intensity And Policy Implications

Climatecouncil.org defines emission intensity as “the volume of emissions per unit of GDP”. The purpose of this metric is to determine the financial implication of polluting so that the policymakers can come up with a budget to mitigate the damage.

It is also an alternative to identify the real ‘big emitters’ of the planet. When countries are ranked on the basis of per capita emission, the advantage goes to the more populous ones, as advocated by the developed nations of the world. In case of absolute emission, the developing nations cry foul and push hard for the ‘principle of equity’. Therefore, many groups are favoring carbon intensity as they try to promote efficient use of resources with economic development.

The IEA has launched a new Energy Sector Carbon Intensity Index (ESCII) in the third edition of its Tracking Clean Energy Progress report. The report states ‘ESCII stood at 2.39 tonnes of CO2 per tonne of oil equivalent (tCO2/toe) in 1990, and had barely moved by 2010, to 2.37 tCO2/toe’. The report also highlights some positives. It states ‘The cost of clean energy technologies fell more rapidly than anticipated. The hybrid vehicle sales passed the 1 million mark. From 2011 to 2012, solar photovoltaic and wind technologies grew by an impressive 42% and 19%, respectively, despite ongoing economic and policy turbulence in the sector”. Despite these technological advancements, the overall emission from energy production is not reducing. It shows there is a lack of consistency in policy implementation.

Consider nations hugely dependent on coal. There has been increased support for renewable energy in the form of investment and government policies. However,fossil fuel subsidies are still extended to ease inflation and produce cheap electricity. Even while President Obama launches his climate change policy to curb power plant emission, an IMF report showcases that the United States remains the single largest subsidizer of fossil fuel in the world with total subsidies amounting to $1.9 trillion per year.

The ESCII, an index consistent with the UNFCCC approach, measures the source of carbon emission. Based on the principle of Material Balance, this approach measures the emission at the point of production rather than at the point of consumption. This gives rise to the phenomenon of ‘Outsourcing Emission’ which means polluting companies are migrating to regions where the environmental regulations and labor laws are less stringent. Overall GHG emission for a country may tumble, down, but this does not truly reflect a its consumption if its citizens and industries are increasingly shopping abroad for manufacturing. New trade laws have been formulated to combat this phenomenon, further complicating an already volatile market.

Similar to the ESCII, the Low Carbon Economy Index of PwC is also based on the rate of change of Global Carbon Intensity. It tries to measure the global emission output against the world GDP growth. This approach discounts the drop in emission caused due to recession or decline in production. A company should use this approach to calculate their emission based on productivity instead of absolute emission to give a more accurate picture. It is not only a matter of environmental compliance but will lead to much better resource utilization and cost estimation of emission

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How EHS Software Can Ensure Worker Safety And Increase Your Bottom Line

How EHS Software Can Ensure Worker Safety And Increase Your Bottom Line

A comprehensive EHS platform can also restructure once-manual safety procedures and contribute to the company’s digital transformation efforts.

The numbers are staggering: In 2016, nearly 3 million people suffered an employer-reported illness or injury in the private sector and more than half required days away from work, job transfers, or restrictions on ability to work, according to the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. According to the bureau, based on rates of injuries, the most injury-prone sectors are animal production, nursing and residential care facilities, couriers and messengers, wood product manufacturing, and air transportation.

One of the most important assets for any organization is its employees, and company leadership must ensure employee safety and well-being to abide by OSHA guidelines, maintain productivity, and mitigate high workers’ compensation costs.

Further, when profit margins are not met, laying off workers or closing plants that are producing below average may seem like a smart approach to save money; however, these organizations should take a closer look at their safety practices and invest in human capital instead.

The Hidden Costs of Deferred Risk

Today, many organizations have fallen into the practice of accepting that accidents on the job are the norm, leading to thousands spent on employee compensation. In fact, according to the National Safety Council (NSC), U.S. companies can spend more than $1 billion per week on direct workers’ compensation costs—medical plus indemnity—significantly impacting gross profits.

Not investing in the right safety resources can also hurt a company in the long run. Just recently, a construction company was fined $135,000 for the head, spinal, and chest injuries an employee suffered last year after falling down stairs at a construction site. The stairway had no intermediate rail or protective meshing, failing to meet industry safety standards.

OSHA continues to ramp up its enforcement efforts for companies ignoring safety. It conducts nearly 41,000 inspections and, in 2016, issued more than 35,000 citations. OSHA identified fall protection as the most-cited violation for the sixth straight year, with hazard communication and scaffolding completing the list of the top three most-cited categories—unchanged from 2015. By creating a strong safety environment, organizations can reduce costs significantly while mitigating risks and protecting brand reputation.

Fostering a Safety Culture

A successful workplace safety culture ensures organizational safety is efficiently and effectively managed and reflective of employee and management values, and it starts from the top. To fully embrace safety as a key component of work life, company leadership must promote and foster a safe environment, setting the tone that organizational safety is a top priority.

Recommendations for creating a successful safety culture include:

  • Having a clear vision: Recognize that safety should be of the utmost importance for the organization and focus the overall strategy around taking the necessary steps to ensure it is.
  • Incorporating the right team: When building a safety culture, it’s important to not only appoint a task force, but also to speak with supervisors and employees on the ground. They can provide valuable insights on pain points that need to be addressed and incorporated into a safety program.
  • Communicating the change: Rally all employees around the safety initiative and provide them with the tools and resources needed to embrace safety as a core part of their daily work lives.

Creating a culture that promotes safety can mean big savings for companies. For example, according to the American Society of Safety Engineers, a Massachusetts company saw a return on investment of $8 for every $1 it invested in its environmental, health, and safety program. Each injury prevented is estimated to save a company $37,000, and a fatality avoided puts nearly $1.4 million back in the financial coffers. This is a tremendous saving for any organization, especially one with hundreds of employees.

Safety as an Investment

Sometimes there is an archaic way of thinking across multiple industries, such as manufacturing, logistics management, and health care: that safety is just a line item, not an investment in the company. However, preventing injuries is only a piece of the savings puzzle when it comes to the benefits of a safety culture. Companies also can reap indirect savings related to investing in safety. Specifically, according to the NSC, more than 60 percent of CFOs reported that each $1 invested in injury prevention returned $2 or more. The report also found that 40 percent of CEOs see increased productivity as the No. 1 asset gained from improving workplace safety. Fewer injuries mean not only lower costs, but also fewer distractions for workers on the job.

Furthermore, according to the ASSE, indirect costs from injuries, such as workers’ compensation, legal fees, and the inevitable need to hire another employee, can be 20 times higher than direct expenses. The indirect costs of injuries on the job include:

  • Training new and old workers
  • Reduced employee morale
  • Fixing old equipment or buying a replacement
  • Poor public relations and brand reputation
  • The need to recoup lost productivity
  • Clerical administration for filing form 300 and other paperwork

Costs such as on-the-job training can average as much as $1,200 per employee, and employee turnover typically costs an organization $5,000 per turnover, according to the 2014 Training Industry Report. Publicly traded companies have an extra incentive to revamp their safety protocols because investors are increasingly using workplace safety and health measures to screen out underperforming stocks. Investors typically see a higher return when incorporating this practice for identifying which stocks to buy into.

It’s important for top management to understand just how valuable safety practices are for an organization. By viewing this “cost” as an investment in human capital, companies can see a significant return.

Software as the Linchpin for Safety Success

Creating an effective EHS strategy can be daunting, but with the right solution and partner, it doesn’t have to be. In fact, not having a robust solution for employee safety can be the one thing holding an organization back from an improved bottom line. For example, when Alcoa’s former CEO, Paul O’Neill, began focusing on being a zero-harm company, sales grew an average of 15 percent per year.

When deploying a solution, it’s important to communicate with key stakeholders in the organization to understand the real pain points and what components of an EHS software solution are needed. Depending on the organization’s sector and types of on-the-job tasks, different forms, metrics, and dashboards will be required for supervisors and/or safety managers. A comprehensive EHS platform can also restructure once-manual safety procedures and contribute to the company’s digital transformation efforts. When an incident occurs, key safety information can be easily inputted and reported to the right department heads in the organization.

What’s more, a solution that utilizes the cloud ensures that incident information is easily accessed and any issues are quickly addressed to prevent future employee incidents or injuries.

EHS software plays a critical role in maintaining a safety culture and compliance. NSC found that manufacturers in 13 states with mandatory regulations for both injury and illness programs, or health and safety committee requirements, were effective in reducing injury and illness incidence rates. One of the many benefits of EHS software solutions is that they can help companies stay organized and keep up with ever-changing regulations. For example, software solutions can streamline, standardize, and track processes essential to ISO 9001 compliance. With reporting and alert features, the organization is held accountable and always audit-ready should an event occur.

While revamping your company’s workplace safety culture can boost cash flow, doing so without the help of EHS software can create more confusion than cohesion among employees. Employees must hear and see from management how significant a zero-incident culture is for them to be invested in it. By focusing resources on human capital, employees will be more productive with improved morale, customers will benefit from increased response times, and the organization will bolster competitive standing while mitigating risks.

When adopting software solutions, utilize a platform that fulfills all organizational needs and choose the right technology partner that helps you go beyond ensuring regulatory compliance—giving you decision-ready intelligence to optimize performance and mitigate risks. By establishing a sustainable, proactive safety culture, any organization can realize the broad and proliferating impact on its bottom line.

Interested in learning how EHS software can help your organization align its EHS program with industry standards and implement a proactive approach? Get a demo today.

Get a Free Demo

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Ready, Set, Save: How EHS Software Protects Worker Lives And Bottom Lines

Ready, Set, Save: How EHS Software Protects Worker Lives And Bottom Lines

The most important asset for a company isn’t its intellectual property or product, but the employee who either puts it together or sells to the customer.

Far too often companies turn to slashing budgets, laying off workers or closing down plants altogether as a means of saving a few dollars here and there. If your organization wants to rise above its competitors and keep a steady bottom line, it’s time to place more investment in human capital.

Put safety on a pedestal

It’s easy to cut back on the resources required for workplace safety and chalk up incidents to human nature. Everybody has accidents, right? But the truth is, some companies are missing opportunities to improve their bottom lines.

Serious injuries on a worksite necessitate a workers’ compensation claim, which cost US companies over $1 billion per week. That number includes only the most debilitating injuries, which leaves out slips and falls and other minor occurrences. Furthermore, these expenses take away from the gross profits a corporation makes.

Businesses that haven’t put too much stock into how they handle workplace safety may be surprised that a Massachusetts company saw a return of investment of $8 for every $1 it invested in its environmental, health and safety program, according to the American Society of Safety Engineers. In fact, each injury prevented is estimated to save a company $37,000, and a fatality avoided puts nearly $1.4 million back in the financial coffers.

EHS Software

Improved workplace safety can reel in big savings. 

You have to spend money to make it

If the exponential savings that can be found from an effective EHS strategy sound too good to be true, that’s likely because you’re thinking too linearly. Preventing injuries is just the beginning—think of it like selling a product. Sure, you gain a profit, but you also get brand exposure, marketing fodder and you’re able to hire new employees because of that sale.

The NSC reported that 40 percent of CEOs see increased productivity as the No. 1 asset gained from improving workplace safety. This is simple math—less injuries means not only lower costs, but also fewer distractions.

Furthermore, according to the ASSE, the indirect costs can be 20 times higher than the direct expenses, which are workers’ compensation, legal fees and the inevitable need to hire another employee. Indirect costs include:

  • Training new and old workers
  • Fixing old equipment or buying a replacement
  • Bad public relations for high on-the-job injury rates
  • Recouping lost productivity
  • Clerical administration needed for filing form 300 and other paperwork
  • Reduced employee morale

The last bullet on that list is perhaps one of the most important. If workers get to the warehouse or plant knowing there’s a chance someone could get injured they’ll not only resent management for not creating a safer work environment, but they’ll second-guess themselves to avoid an accidentan action that could result in another incident.

Publicly traded companies do have a little extra incentive to revamp their safety protocols, as the ASSE reported. Investors are increasingly evaluating corporate governance—the importance management places on its workers—as a means of identifying which stocks to buy into. So, not only could improving your organizations EHS help revenue flow, but it could raise the stock price, which is an extra bonus for any corporate shareholder.

Don’t waste any more time

Overhauling your EHS strategy can be daunting, but it can also be the thing holding your company back from improved revenue and a bottom line that’s consistently in the black. Taking the time to keep your employees safe now will yield dividends down the line.

“EHS software plays a crucial role in a safety culture revamp.”

 A safety program without EHS software supporting it will ultimately fall short of its optimal potential, making it an imperative investment for any business. By systematizing safety management, organizations are able to digitally record and analyze injuries and near-missesa crucial factor in improving workplace safety. Rather than using paper documents and spreadsheets, safety managers can track and trend data to identify incident root causes, and ultimately predict and prevent future occurrences.

Assembling a safety committee made up of shift leaders and managers is the next step, according to Workers’ Comp Insights. This facilitates open communication between those on the ground, and the people designing the safety program. Meet up each week to discuss faulty equipment, hazardous conditions and even what training is needed.

One of the most important steps in creating a safer workplace is keeping up with changing regulations. This is where EHS software is wildly effective—a top-of-the-line platform will alert the organization of any upcoming revisions to industry best practices and share training materials that can be used to educate workers.

While revamping your company’s workplace safety culture can certainly boost cash flow in a positive way, doing so without the help of EHS software can create more confusion than cohesion. Be sure to get a platform that fits your organization’s needs and workflow, and it’ll ultimately be an asset moving forward. 

Connect with ProcessMAP today to learn more about the product and how we can help you bolster your EHS objectives. 

Schedule a Free Demo Today

 

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ProcessMAP Connected Worker Apps Accelerate Digital Transformation

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ProcessMAP Connected Worker Apps Accelerate Digital Transformation

Smartphones and tablets have significantly upended the way we conduct business operations, our daily tasks, and even how we interact with each other. It is therefore not a surprise that smartphone penetration in the United States is estimated to have crossed 81% of the population mark by the end of 2020. The United Kingdom is close at 79%, and China is not too far behind at 63% penetration. What these numbers imply is that most EHS and ORM stakeholders are often within an arm’s distance from their smartphone, and they interact with consumer-focused apps to complete end-to-end workflows for their personal tasks. However, when it comes to the enterprise apps, the landscape is very different. Very few apps on your phone can help you with the day to day processes of your workplace. 

The situation has started changing with the advent of low-code/ no-code application development platforms. In fact, the Low-Code Application Platform (LCAP) market has grown rapidly over the past few years, and according to Forrester, it is estimated to become a $21.2 billion business by 2022. 

But What is a No-Code/ Low-Code Application Platform?

A no-code/low-code application development platform is a solution for building software applications without requiring any coding, just like ProcessMAP’s Connected Worker Apps platform. LCAPs are fast becoming a popular alternative to traditional software development for non-technical business users hoping to build their own full-fledged applications. EHS leaders and stakeholders within ProcessMAP’s global customer community have used the Connected Worker app platform to develop hundreds of mobile apps for their specific business requirements. 

How Does it Work? 

The ProcessMAP Connected Worker Apps platform offers users an intuitive graphical user interface to drag and drop elements and define the workflow logic to quickly create apps. Using visual models replaces the complexity of coding for users. The platform utilizes declarative UI that describes what the user should see, instead of how it should be laid out. This allows platform users to render the same app across multiple devices (various types of mobile phones, tablets, and even desktop computers) and platforms (iOS, Android, and browsers). 

Some additional standard benefits of utilizing a LCAP include: 

  • Rapid development and deployment of apps – reduces the time to realize the value of investment 
  • Significantly reduced costs – users do not require expensive software developers to build or maintain the apps
  • Increased digitization of processes and productivity of workers
  • Flexibility to add or edit functionalities and logic to the app at any point in time

In addition to the benefits listed above, ProcessMAP’s Connected Worker apps also offer comprehensive benefits from EHS and risk management point of view. Some of the advantages include: 

  • Connected users can use the apps to capture and report images and videos of safety hazards before they become risks
  • The Connected Workers apps can be made available in multiple languages so that the same digital workflows are followed across multiple locations
  • The apps can be configured to perform various kinds of mathematical calculations, and even have conditional logic to follow based on user inputs
  • Record- and field-level security capabilities ensure strong data security and privacy 
  • Integration of Connected Worker Apps with advanced analytics and data visualization tools enables users to get a 360-degree view of their EHS and ORM initiatives 

There are many more benefits offered by ProcessMAP Connected Worker apps. To learn more, click here

How Are Customers Using ProcessMAP Connected Worker Apps? 

ProcessMAP customers have embraced the Connected Worker Platform and have used it to solve a whole host of business challenges.

  • An industrial solutions organization developed and deployed apps worldwide for daily forklift inspections, PPE inventory management and other safety improvements. In addition to English language apps, the company was also able to configure and deploy these apps in Spanish and Portuguese for its Latin American locations.
  • Another customer in the electric utilities industry utilized the Connected Worker Platform to create a daily pre-job safety briefing app that captures discussions on specific roles and responsibilities, procedures and hazards and controls identification prior to beginning any job. The apps were deployed for Automated External Defibrillator (AED) inspections and monthly facility inspections.
  • In working to reduce injuries within its organization, a customer deployed a Machine Guarding Assessment app that is designed to help employees to assess and identify risks, and manage corrective actions, to help reduce the likelihood of workplace injuries and improving productivity.
  • To ensure employees have access to required PPE before commencing work, a leading global technology solutions provider to high-value segments of the food processing and air transportation industries deployed the daily PPE check app to its shift managers across multiple customer facilities. These managers are now using the app to digitally confirm employees have the necessary PPE, saving time and improving productivity.
  • A customer in the industrial waste management field deployed the Quality Assurance/Quality Control app to capture issues and concerns related to the quality of the services, and the associated corrective action items required to improve these issues.

These are just a handful of examples from amongst hundreds of such interesting use-cases for which customers relied upon the ProcessMAP Connected Worker apps. The mobile revolution is just starting in the enterprise app landscape, and particularly for EHS and ORM use-cases. We already notice rapid adoption of mobile solutions by our customers across the world, and the advantages of LCAP apps are further accelerating the digital transformation of workplace processes. To learn more about how ProcessMAP can help you accelerate your digital transformation initiatives, Sign up for a free, no-commitment consultation with our Center of Excellence team, today! 

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The Benefits Of Adapting IIoT And Data Analytics Solutions For EHS

The Benefits Of Adapting IIoT And Data Analytics Solutions For EHS

The IIoT (Industrial Internet of Things) improves connectivity, efficiency and scalability for industrial organisations. Combined with the power of big data and analytics, the IIoT is an incredibly powerful concept that drives in-depth insights for organisations. Many companies are already leveraging IIoT and data analytics with remarkable success in core operations and achieving significant results in time and cost savings.

One application of the IIoT that can make an equally impactful mark on a business is the management of environmental health and safety (EHS) risks. EHS risk management focuses on protecting employees, the public and the environment from harm. This risk focus is in the form of reducing the probability of an incident occurring and its consequences or adverse effects, says Jagan Garimella, CTO of ProcessMAP.

With the number of connected devices expected to reach upward of 100 billion by 2025, the opportunities to use such devices effectively to help manage EHS only continues to increase. Connected technology can enhance EHS management practices and by embracing the IIoT for EHS, companies can take advantage of new opportunities to reduce the risk of injury to workers and harmful impacts to the environment.

However, sometimes even the best ideas are met with objections. Below are two common objections/challenges you will likely encounter when planning a Safety Stand-Down – and what you can do to overcome them and plan effective Stand-Downs at your organization.

  1. “We talk about safety all the time, so why do we need to do a Stand-Down?”

Here’s why it’s important to go above and beyond this week:

  • You can never talk about safety enough.
    Focused and meaningful conversations on a topic keep it top of mind for your workers.
  • Putting safety before production shows commitment.
    Holding these discussions, along with dedicating time and resources for proper training and equipment, will show employees that safety is priority and inspire them to take it seriously.
  1. “What should we talk about? And when should we hold the sessions?”

There isn’t a magic formula, but ask yourself these questions when planning Stand-Down sessions:

  • During which day of the week do the most injuries occur?
  • At what time of day are employees more likely to get hurt?
  • What is your most common type of injury? What is the cause of that injury? And, how can this injury be prevented?

Don’t just use your instincts to answer questions – use insights drawn from analysis of your incident data. Let your data guide the planning process and use it to emphasize the importance of safety during the talks themselves to maintain participant engagement.

Your ability to answer these questions and hold effective Stand-Downs will rely on your company’s effectiveness in managing incidents and tracking incident data. Having accurate information as well as the right analytical tools will help you identify your program’s biggest issues and build prevention strategies.

Here are some examples of how data can help you plan your Stand-Down strategy:

A heat map like the one below shows you what shifts have the highest number of recordable injuries.

data analytics solutions for EHS

Let’s delve into what benefits IIoT and data analytics provide from an EHS risk management perspective:

  • Asset management and maintenanceIIoT can provide immediate updates on the performance and safety status of facility and production assets. With sensors connected to a business’s most critical assets, large volumes of accurate data can be collected for real-time monitoring and analysis which can help prevent failures before they happen to propel asset performance improvements. For instance, a recent study determined that companies that are Top Quartile performers with condition-based, planned maintenance have fewer equipment emergencies resulting in 71 % lower maintenance cost and 14 % less downtime.
  • Next-level business intelligenceIIoT can serve as a forecasting tool for more informed EHS management and decision making by constantly monitoring, aggregating and analysing data from various sensors. These sensors can be installed across a connected plant or workplace and provide real-time data allowing companies to obtain insights to various operations and initiate preventative actions. For example, IoT sensors are often installed to measure parametres at remote or high-risk maintenance infrastructure that is difficult or dangerous to physically access. Such infrastructure can be situated below the surface, atop high terrain, or even in isolated areas. Data from these places allows companies to prepare for emergency planning, maintenance and compliance activities.
  • Risk mitigation with actionable insightsIIoT can provide terabytes of data from device monitoring and incident information. This data can be analysed to decipher key trends and required actions to help mitigate the risk of potential future incidents. With IIoT and data analytics, businesses can enable corrective and preventative actions more quickly and accurately. For instance, managers can establish patterns where and how incidents are occurring and, with the data analysis, predict potential future re-occurrences and determine the best plans of action for risk mitigation.

The business case for IIoT for EHS is clear, so what can companies do to pursue an IIoT-enabled solution?

Though IIoT is still an early technology, it is improving rapidly and, more importantly, changing every day. As such, companies should be judicious if looking to invest in a full IIoT solution right away without considering the nuances involved with such a fast-evolving technology.

The best approach is to start small and slow by picking one area – connected assets, wearables, software architecture, etc. – of IIoT enablement to optimise uses, and then focus on building an IIoT platform from there. Systematically adding new areas of functionality with robust data analytics will allow organisations to grow the platform organically while slowly integrating IIoT enablement into any existing EHS processes.

After implementation, companies could setup well-defined metrics and goals for incident prevention for example, and then work to meet those goals while increasing the scale of deployment for IIoT. According to Intel, IIoT for asset management can boost production by an estimated 5-25 % and increase asset utilisation by 3-5 %. These can be valuable benchmarks for an organisation to evaluate its progress.

Most importantly, technology alone cannot solve every business issue when it comes to EHS risk management. IIoT and data analytics for EHS are tools managers can use to forecast threats, collect data, and ultimately make better decisions. To move to a zero-incident culture, companies must also have a comprehensive EHS strategy and protocols in place and use IIoT to gain further insight and enhance safety measures within an organisation.

Nonetheless, with the right people, right strategy, and right technology courtesy of IIoT, any company regardless of size can make great strides in environmental health and safety as long as they remember that a steady and methodical approach is best.

Interested in learning how EHS software can help your organization align its EHS program with industry standards and implement a proactive approach? Get a demo today.

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Industry’s Growing Attraction To New Sustainability Scorecards

Industry’s Growing Attraction To New Sustainability Scorecards

My anticipation of the GRI 4.0 guidelines, which are to be released in the later part of May, led me to consider what are benefits reaped from companies answering long questionnaires or maintaining sustainability scorecards? Also, who uses these scorecards, and why?

One simple explanation is just having the name in these leadership indices list promotes brand perception for the companies which in turn increases their brand value. Stakeholder pressure also pressures companies to do so. NGOs, trade associations, government, shareholders and investors are asking for more disclosures – and this trend is growing every day. Walmart, Dell and other companies are requesting disclosure information from their suppliers.

Vendor scorecards have existed for a long time, but what has changed is the amount of information asked. Modern day scorecards rate the Sustainable supply chain, climate change and natural resources management initiatives of the companies. 

One simple explanation is just having the name in these leadership indices list promotes brand perception for the companies which in turn increases their brand value. Stakeholder pressure also pressures companies to do so. NGOs, trade associations, government, shareholders and investors are asking for more disclosures – and this trend is growing every day. Walmart, Dell and other companies are requesting disclosure information from their suppliers.

Vendor scorecards have existed for a long time, but what has changed is the amount of information asked. Modern day scorecards rate the Sustainable supply chain, climate change and natural resources management initiatives of the companies.

From an investor’s’ point of view, investing in a company which has assessed its long term climate change risks makes more sense. Sustainable investment, also known as ‘socially responsible investment’ (SRI), has grown enormously in the past decade. In many cases, sustainable funds have outperformed the market. A recent survey , conducted by IISD demonstrates this trend clearly. Of the 300 investment professionals who participated, 33% reported that they or their firms offered Sustainable investment as one of the options for Sustainability Performance Management.

Additional motivation for the companies can be to see their name in the Leadership indices like CDLI and CPLI. Many managers feel that the visibility and the interest of such indices generates translates into investor confidence in the long run.

So, to answer the question I posed in the beginning, companies have to measure and report a lot of data to their various stakeholders. It makes sense to earn more returns on their efforts by reporting it to organizations like CDP and GRI and gain a competitive advantage from it.

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4 Safety Tips That Save Workers’ Lives

4 Safety Tips That Save Workers' Lives

As the seasons change, so do the dangers posed to workers. While the Occupational Safety and Health Administration has a number of regulations in place to curb the risks associated with many jobs, the truth is the agency is quite small.

There’s just one OSHA officer for roughly every 60,000 workers, according to OSHA, which means safety managers carry the bulk of the responsibility in making sure employees and their work environment are safe. This is easier said than done, so here are some tips that can help an organization get started on the right track:

1. Fatal Four

In 2014, there were 4,386 private sector employee fatalities, or 13 each day over the course of the year, OSHA reported. An overwhelming one out of every five of these deaths came from the construction industry. In particular, the Fatal Four accounted for 545 of them.

Tip: Reduce Fatal Four injuries by developing routines aimed at mitigating exposure.

Falls, electrocutions, struck by object and caught-in/between incidents all form this infamous group. All of these accidents are entirely avoidable if properly accounted for. For example, Health Day reported scaffolds and ladders should be inspected, secured and anchored before use. Nets should be used for extreme heights.

As for the other three, simple worksite awareness creates a safe environment. Those working with wires should first turn off all power at the location, and then put on rubber gloves, boots and a hard hat. Also avoid damp or wet locations. Being aware and vocal about large equipment on the move within a worksite can help employees avoid the latter two incidents of the Fatal Four.

Safety tips
Thoroughly inspect and clean winter worksites each day.

2. Worksite cleanup

It’s likely over the next few months that worksites will become littered with leaves, snow and ice. These conditions contribute to an unsafe work environment and should be a priority on organizations’ safety checklists.

Tip: Clean the location before working.

This seems like a simple habit that every safety manager should have in place, but larger organizations can’t keep eyes on every worksite. This means designating an employee to conduct site inspections before the day begins to avoid any potential oversight.

This all starts with keeping an eye on weather patterns. Strong winds and blizzards can create unsafe work environments, and companies should avoid sending workers out those days. Leaves and ice should be removed from a worksite and organizations should provide a warm area for employees to take breaks in. Most important is providing the right safety equipment for workers—it’s easy to catch hypothermia without the proper clothing. The source also recommended providing proper training on how to spot the signs of frostbite and how to stay warm throughout an eight-hour workday.

3. Better organization

Things can get chaotic inside a warehouse. Employees move all over the place, while forklifts weave in and out to reach their final destinations. If the majority of workplace accidents stem from the facility, it could be because of a lack of organization.

Tip: Designate specific areas for specific functions.

“Extra signage and demarcated lanes for operation create a safe work environment.”

Workplace accidents involving hazard communication and forklifts are both in OSHA’s top 10 most frequently cited standards. Reducing exposure to these incidents is crucial in creating a safe work environment. Designating certain areas of the warehouse for distinct operations will help employees stay aware of potential accidents and could reduce the number of incidents occurring.

For example, mark common forklift routes with a clearly visible yellow line. This helps drivers stay on course and gives a subtle alert to the rest of the workers on the floor to watch out for any incoming traffic. Hazard communication signs should be plentiful, and a first-aid station should be in plain sight so it’s easily accessible in the case of an emergency.

4. Follow the data

Employees can never receive enough training. If you find your workplace is still having accidents occur, you should track these incidents, identify the root cause, correlate the incidents with contributing factors, and implement corrective actions—which often involve training.

Tip: Use data to identify hotspots for injuries.

OSHA’s new digital reporting rule makes tracking injury data easy. Companies can use Environmental, Health and Safety software to line up injury rates against test scores. If employees score low in the same area that a lot of accidents originate, then a safety manager should schedule more training sessions to inform workers of the correct way to complete that particular task.

Analysis is essential in figuring out how an organization’s employees incur injuries on the job. Safety managers should make these figures visible to every worker. When it comes to safety, transparency is key, and companies that embrace that mantra will undoubtedly have an easier time creating a safe work environment.

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A 3 Step Strategy Adopted By CIRCOR To Safeguard Employees And Operations During COVID-19

A 3 Step Strategy Adopted By CIRCOR To Safeguard Employees And Operations During COVID-19

CIRCOR International And ProcessMAP

While companies around the world have grappled with the challenge of managing through the COVID-19 pandemic, ProcessMAP Corporation, the industry leader in offering a data intelligence platform for employee Health and Safety, and Environmental Sustainability (EHS), has been conducting one of the largest EHS leadership roundtables –Winning COVID-19 with ProcessMAP. During one of our recent roundtable sessions, Perry Hawkins, Corporate Director for EHS and Risk Management at CIRCOR International, shared how his organization approached operational readiness plans and employee health and wellness.  

CIRCOR International is a global manufacturer of valves, pumps, and associated products and services. CIRCOR has more than 4,400 employees across 24 manufacturing facilities in more than 12 countries. The company is a leader in various flow and motion control products and services for the oil and gas, power generation, aerospace, defense, and industrial markets worldwide. 

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded to become a global health crisis, CIRCOR quickly assembled a corporate-level, cross-functional, crisis management team with leaders from Human Resources, EH&S, Continuous Improvement, and Legal. This team worked directly with the company’s Executive Committee to take necessary actions and acted as a conduit between the company and its customers and suppliers.

CIRCOR implemented a COVID-19 contact or exposure scenario-based decision tree to communicate procedures and next-steps to employees who had either direct, indirect (secondary) or negligible contacts. Depending on the exposure scenario, employees had to adhere to procedures requiring mandatory quarantine or self-quarantine.

In addition, CIRCOR rolled out a three-step COVID-19 response plan for all its sites:

Step 1

  • Assembled a plant-level crisis management team that included the P&L leader, Plant Manager, HR Manager, EH&S Manager, and the Supply Chain Manager for each facility

Step 2

  • Developed the protocols for quarantine and notifications
  • Prepared a communication strategy for both internal plant communications and external communications
  • Enacted safety protocols that included engineering controls, administrative controls, and PPE
  • Implemented a cleaning and decontamination strategy
  • Managed operations and facilities by ensuring adequate staffing for critical functions, availability of emergency services, and continuity of the supply chain to meet customer requirements

Step 3

  • Developed an action plan to adhere to the emergency requirements issues by local and national governments, and support essential operations while suspending operations for non-essential functions

CIRCOR continues to follow these practices as the company now pivots towards preparing itself for employees to return to work. We appreciate Perry sharing his insights and best practices from CIRCOR’s playbook to stay resilient during this crisis period.

This blog is a part of a new series of curated content that ProcessMAP is sharing with the larger EHS community, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Watch this space for our next blog! To read our previous blog in this series, Click Here! Share your thoughts and perspectives, in the comments section below, on how are you managing the impact of COVID-19 at your workplace.

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