From Inception To Influence: The Maturity Curve Of EHS, Risk, And Quality

From Inception To Influence: The Maturity Curve Of EHS, Risk, And Quality

Remember the saying, “Rome wasn’t built in a day?” As you know, neither is world-class EHS performance. 

With the increased pressure on EHS professionals, some people are expected to move from paper reports to predictive analytics overnight. Others are tasked with leaping from an incident rate of five to zero in just one quarter. In the frenzy to meet increasing demands, the level of effort required to achieve world-class EHS results sometimes gets overlooked.

Realistically, there is a maturity process in many aspects of life, including business. Startups with negative balance sheets don’t generate $1B in profits overnight. It takes time, the right tools, and good talent.

What is EHS risk management?

Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) risk management refers to the process of identifying avenues of potential health and safety hazards within an organization and effectively assessing their impact, causality, as well as preventative measures against further risk. 

The same principle applies to achieving world-class EHS results. Knowing where you are on the maturity curve and what it takes to advance to the next step are critical to your success. 

Let’s take a look at a maturity curve for EHS, Risk, and Quality departments. These groups are historically in a less advanced phase compared to that of their organizations’ Finance or HR departments. In my career, I have found that EHS, Risk, and Qualitys groups have similar maturity curves. These are depicted in the above graphic.

What lessons have you learned moving along this maturity curve? Leave a comment below to let us know.

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New OSHA Silica Standard: What You Need To Know

New OSHA Silica Standard: What You Need To Know

OSHA has updated its silica exposure regulations for the first time since 1971. The final rule took effect on June 23. Depending on the industry, employers have between one to five years to comply. Silica, also known as quartz, is the second most common mineral found in the earth’s crust and is known to cause lung disease and cancer. Exposure to this common and dangerous substance is prevalent in various industries including construction, fracturing, and quartz counter manufacturing.

So, how will this rule affect how you protect workers from silica?

Employers will have to limit worker exposure to silica based on new OSHA regulations

Overall, this OSHA rule calls for employers to reduce employee exposure to silica and dictates the procedures employers should follow. Implementing these changes across multiple locations can be a complex task. But with the right tools, you can use this rule change as a catalyst for improved lung health across your entire organization.

ProcessMAP’s Occupational Health Management and Industrial Hygiene Management solutions provide enterprise-wide consistency and visibility into the detection and reporting of hazardous materials, standardization of employee protection protocol, and proactive monitoring of employee exposure levels. This visibility ensures compliance with OSHA regulations and optimizes IH resources to better protect employee health.

Integrated Training & Performance Management allows organizations to deliver, track, and report on targeted learning objectives within a central platform – improving training effectiveness and reducing the risk of non-compliant behaviors.

With these components of ProcessMAP’s EHS & Compliance software platform, you can exceed OSHA standards and see your company’s progress in real time, streamlining the execution and documentation of your health & safety efforts. You can ensure that employees are provided adequate protection, monitored consistently, and educated and trained on how to behave in the best interest of their health.

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Implementing Environmental, Health, And Safety Software

Implementing Environmental, Health, And Safety Software

So, you want to implement software to manage Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) related risk within your organization?

Managing risk is an important part of what an EHS professional does every day. I should know; I spent 15 years designing and running programs designed to maintain compliance, support operations, control costs, and most importantly…keep people safe. 

In the early stages of a risk management program, you can get by with spreadsheets and access databases. However, as time goes on and the programs become bigger and you receive more visibility across your organization, you need more.

You need a hazard analysis software platform that can help you identify, manage, prevent, and someday help you predict risk.

Over the next few blog posts, I’m going to talk about what it takes to make the transition from spreadsheets to a cloud based risk platform successful. I will answer a variety of critical questions, including:

  • What should you know before undertaking this type of project?
  • Which IT related terms should you be familiar with?
  • What should go into the design of such a solution?
  • How do you prepare your organization for go-live and what do you do after go-live to maintain the momentum and reap the benefits of your new tool?

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Implementing EHS Software: Part 2

Implementing EHS Software: Part 2

In part one of my post, I discussed the importance of risk as it relates to EHS management and which tools are better suited for different stages of the process.

So let’s presume that you’re ready to go beyond managing risk, to preventing and predicting risk. That means you have to transition from Microsoft Excel.
Before selecting the right software system to support your risk/EHS program, you should define your objectives. Because without knowing what your personal, department and corporate objectives are and how you want to align them, you’re essentially traversing the universe of options without a map.

When trying to create this map to guide you, think about all the different areas your company manages:

This list will be long. I tell you to think about the things your company manages, not just your department, because having one platform that covers a good portion of your areas of risk is a good long- term strategy.

Once you have the list of areas you manage, you need a few more things to create your map. Make a list of what you need, want, and would be nice to have in a software system by area. Understanding these requirements will help you evaluate each platform. Make sure you’re thinking about your future state not just what you do today when making this list.

Here are a few things to consider:

  • When an incident happens, do you have to call your insurance provider and record the incident in your OSHA logs?
  • Do you have an accurate chemical inventory and access to all of your SDS?
  • Are you doing all of the IH sampling you need or want to do?
  • Do you conduct audits across the globe and have a need for questions in multiple languages?
  • Are you able to create and manage a risk based audit program or are you just auditing sites on a regular basis?
  • Are you confident in your sustainability data, does it take you a long time to collect it?

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The Changing Shape Of BI: Are We Doing Enough?

The Changing Shape Of BI: Are We Doing Enough?

Recently, I came across an article which mentions BIG DATA 1.0 was all about storing volumes of independent silos of data to provide competitive advantage to business. Organizations would toy with Data Mining architecture to generate meaningful content and Business Intelligence. There is much hype and hoopla surrounding the analysis of independent silos of data, but is it worth the effort? The deluge of data is difficult to store, capture and visualize. A proliferation of diverse datasets- from historical data to recordable data and from safety records to sustainability data is even difficult to manage.

What are the organizations doing with safety and sustainability data today? A dashboard generating some insight would be a simple answer- with difficulty being stakeholders requiring different reports and formats. If the dashboard is built on data stored independently without interfacing other datasets, the representation would hardly give any competitive advantage.

Integration is the key. BIG DATA 2.0 is about integration which makes data useful through contextualization and correlation. There is a paradigm shift in the perception that point-to-point integration would generate some meaningful content, where upgrading to next version is a key challenge. Point-to-point integration consumes resources, time and often yields unexpected consequences. The effective solution is to build a model which presents a more holistic way data is interpreted. An example would be records related to the employee i.e. Exposure, Incident, and Health & Safety records as well as personal information. The solution in the mentioned case would be an application wherein the personal records would be interfacing the application having Health & Safety record. The Health & Safety records would be analyzed to estimate the probable incidents in which employee might be involved directly or indirectly. The proactive risk management would thus enable the organization to minimize the incident rate.

BIG DATA 2.0 would enable the organization to rediscover value through a refined modeling process: make a hypothesis, create visual models, validate and create a new hypothesis again, resulting in enterprise-wide integrated platform. The key for safety and environmental data visualization is to collect data in standard formats, determine the datasets which are relevant to the stakeholders and to feed the data in an adaptive algorithm, thus providing competitive advantage to the business.

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Driving EHS Performance With Data-Informed Decisions

Driving EHS Performance With Data-Informed Decisions

You can never have too much data. Businesses now use troves of numbers and analytics to drive better workplace safety decisions. Front and center in this transition from intangible to tangible insights is Environmental, Health and Safety software, which has become a vehicle for the transformation of employee safety.

Data and safety—a harmonious relationship

There’s a shift happening for safety managers. They now increasingly try to predict rather than react to injuries, according to a study by i4cp. The report revealed roughly 70 percent of executive teams use data analytic platforms in a human capital capacity—such as improving quality of life on the job for their employees.

Simply put, it costs more to react to an event rather than actively seeking to prevent it. The Occupational Health and Safety Association estimated U.S. businesses spend upwards of $170 billion per year on workplace injuries and illnesses, as well as the associated costs. These are expenses like workers’ compensation, litigation fees, lost productivity and onboarding for new employees to fill injured workers’ shoes. This doesn’t even take into account the cost of record-keeping and attending to these injuries on-site.

In this regard, better EHS performance stems from safety managers paying closer attention to workplace injuries’ origins. It’s not always clean-cut how these accidents take place, though. While at the surface a slip and fall from a ladder may seem like a thoughtless mistake or a one-off event, it could signal a failure in policy and procedures, or even a faulty product in use.

Identifying potential pitfalls has ultimately led to better worksite performance as a result, according to LNS Research. The source reported manufacturers that have EHS visibility through metrics and common analytics ultimately generate a 21 percent improvement in overall equipment effectiveness over those who don’t. This figure represents a sizable portion of lost profit.

It’s clear understanding why injuries occur in the first place will likely yield better EHS performance for a company, but how do you predict the future?

EHS software promotes data-driven decision-making.

Software to the rescue

Organizations aiming to improve workplace safety simply can’t do so without taking a proactive approach to it, which requires the implementation of a system to record and track injury reports. After a recent ruling from OSHA, digital reporting will become a requirement for many companies. EHS software simply provides a platform for these companies to utilize that data rather than just submit it to the governing body.

“EHS software takes guessing out of the equation.”

EHS software provides an all-encompassing look into why injuries occur, what the originating factors are and connects the dots that were previously invisible to the naked eye. This latter part is important, as collecting data isn’t the primary concern. According to a KPMG study, 85 percent of chief financial and chief information officers don’t know what to do with the aggregated numbers. EHS software takes guessing out of the equation.

OSHA estimated companies that incorporate some type of EHS system into their workplace safety procedures can ultimately shave up to 40 percent off of their workers’ injury and illness costs. While that’s an encouraging financial value, it doesn’t speak to the whole picture. The very definition of superior EHS performance is a safer work environment, which ultimately leads to improved productivity and better employee engagement levels.

Data-informed decision-making allows companies to identify potential dangers in a workspace before they happen rather than take the wait-and-see approach. This allows safety managers to develop new and innovative strategies for onboarding employees, informing them of common dangers associated with different worksites and helping workers keep up to speed with ever-changing compliance rules within any given industry. By incorporating EHS software, organizations gain the all-seeing eye they’ve been looking for when it comes to keeping employees safe.

Interested in learning how EHS software can help your organization align its EHS program with industry standards and implement a proactive approach? Get a demo today.

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Recent OSHA Ruling Reduces Worker Beryllium Exposure

Recent OSHA Ruling Reduces Worker Beryllium Exposure

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration once again proved its allegiance to workers’ health with a recent ruling that updates a decades-old beryllium exposure standard.

Getting the Facts Straight

Beryllium is a natural occurring element found commonly in the earth’s crust in a variety of materials such as rocks, soil, and volcanic dust. Also, it can be detected in very small quantities in foods, such as beans and barley.

Beryllium Exposure

Due to its properties (light weight, stiffness, resistant to corrosion, etc.), Beryllium is a key component of materials used in industrial applications in several industries, including the aerospace, defense, automotive, and medical sectors. Despite all of its charm (you can’t deny the beauty of a piece of beryl or bertrandite nor the sophistication of beryllium containing materials), beryllium can pose health risks to workers. During the processing of beryllium-containing materials, small particles containing beryllium can become airborne in the forms of dust or fumes and in quantities that can exceed the permissible exposure levels in occupational environments.

Workers who handle beryllium containing materials and are exposed to airborne particles above permissible levels are at risk of developing a serious lung disease known as Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD).

Members of the beryllium industry have long researched the mechanisms of exposure to beryllium particulate, the health effects associated with such exposures, and the best methods and practices for keeping beryllium exposure as low as feasiblly possible while processing beryllium-containing materials.  As a result, the beryllium industry came up with the Beryllium Worker Protection Model, which outlines the best practices and controls to reduce workers’ exposures to beryllium and most importantly, that have been proven to be effective in the prevention of CBD.

In this model, individuals are able to understand the likelihood of exposure to beryllium particulate given the material being processed and the techniques utilized to do so. The individuals are also instructed how to control such exposures. In addition, the model has recommended observing a Recommended Exposure Limit to Beryllium of 0.2 micrograms of beryllium per cubic meter of air (0.2 µg/m3) for over 10 years, well prior to the new OSHA Beryllium rule.

OSHA’s New Beryllium Rule: What You Need to Know

After a few years of collaborative work between the top producer in the beryllium industry (Materion Brush, Inc.) and labor representatives (United Steel Workers), the entities jointly proposed a new model standard to OSHA in 2012. OSHA issued its final standard for Beryllium on January 9th of this year.

The new OSHA Beryllium Standard now regulates a PEL of 0.2 µg/m3, which is similar to what has been recommended for over a decade by the beryllium industry to its customers, vendors, and to anyone else that has been interested in learning how to best protect workers’ health.

In addition, the new OSHA Beryllium Standard provides employers with requirements on other elements of worker health protection that include:

This is the first update that OSHA has made to the Beryllium PEL since its inception in 1972. The new OSHA Beryllium Standard regulation goes into effect on March 10, 2017. This date is likely to be extended for another 60 days due to the change in the administration. Therefore, the new effective date will be established by an Executive Order. One year after that date, most elements of the standard will be enforced.

Some requirements of the standard that are more complex in nature (more resource demanding) are scheduled to be enforced between 2 to 3 years following the effective date. Therefore, businesses have been provided with ample time to strategize how they’ll comply with the standard.

My recommendation to the affected industries and businesses is to start promptly strategizing a compliance plan with the new Beryllium Standard. For this, there are valuable resources made available by the beryllium industry, including the experts themselves who are willing to share best practices on beryllium worker health protection. For more information, you can contact the Materion Product Safety Hotline at 1-800-862-4118 (outside the U.S.) or +1-216-383-4019 (within the U.S.).

In addition, if you want to learn how best manage your beryllium exposure data and need to pinpoint the departments, work areas and tasks that are likely to be of concern from an exposure profile standpoint, contact us to inquire about our Industrial Hygiene Management solution.

Like everything else in life, increase your odds of success by going to the experts and those who have mastered that which you deeply desire.

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ProcessMAP Konnect 2019 User Conference Demonstrates Customer Focus And Presents Future Product Vision

ProcessMAP Konnect 2019 User Conference Demonstrates Customer Focus And Presents Future Product Vision

Key takeaways and perspectives from ProcessMAP Konnect 2019 – the annual global user conference at ProcessMAP that brought together new and existing customers, EHS thought leaders, industry trailblazers, and strategic partners. 

EHSQ software vendor ProcessMAP held its annual ProcessMAP Konnect User Conference on May 20-22, in Florida. The event brought together new and existing customers, individual users, partner firms and speakers from across the US and several other countries. As a conference participant, Verdantix had a front row seat to see ProcessMAP’s approach towards co-innovating with customers, improving its software platform and planning for the future.

Kicking off the conference, Todd Jones, EVP of Customer Success, posed the question, “How can we improve in 2019?” During the subsequent two days, ProcessMAP demonstrated its focus on customer needs and requests. Through interactive learning sessions, product demos, interactive poll questions and one-on-one conversations, ProcessMAP employees regularly sought users’ ideas and actively listened to their input.

ProcessMAP also shared how it is aggregating customer-specific data across users to identify trends in EHS incidents, help benchmark safety performance by industry, and better understand how firms are using software modules and which EHSQ criteria they are employing. 

For example, Dave Rath, CEO, and Harold Gubnitsky, President and Chief Strategy Officer, shared a graphic (refer to the chart on the right side) showing the progressive decline in customers’ average OSHA Recordable Incident Rates, from over 2.5 in early 2017 to just under 1.0 in late 2018.

Environmental, Health and Safety management operations have changed significantly amid the adoption of modern technologies capable of performing tasks that have traditionally been more costly and time-consuming.

Nonetheless, there are some who may still be considering the idea of supplementing (or replacing) their business’ or organization’s tried-and-true EHS setup with modern solutions. In order to do so properly, there are several things that those in charge of the transition process need to know before drawing up plans, purchasing new EHS tools or making hasty changes to daily operations.

According to LNS Research, the overall modernization of EHS operations is sometimes referred to as “EHS 4.0” — described as a reference to “Industry 4.0, also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution.” This has brought about advances from traditional EHS management and operational approaches with the advent of groundbreaking technologies.

Here are three things that you should know to bring your organization’s into the EHS 4.0 phase — or a suitable equivalent:

1. Know which aspect(s) of your EHS operations need an overhaul
Today’s EHS solutions harness the advantages offered by modern technologies adopted across many industries and bring with them comprehensive new services and tools. Before taking the leap into the modern EHS world, one should consider which aspects of their existing operations need changes or improvements. According to Industrial Safety and Hygiene News, tech trends proving highly innovative to business development are the internet of things, big data analytics, cloud computing and mobile applications; all of these can be applied to different areas of EHS operations.

According to LNS Research’s Peter Bussey, organizations’ EHS management today has generally followed several trends that have brought about a change in the way it works in relation to different departments’ regular operations. The trend towards digital solutions, for example, has resulted in an increased appreciation and investment in EHS as an asset that “creates and delivers value,” Bussey wrote. Higher standards for transparency and disclosure across many industries today require a reliance on the study and mitigation of risk that can be provided by EHS professionals.

One also should consider the fact that many organizations’ mainstays are aging and nearing retirement. Regardless of whether these employees are already familiar with new EHS technologies, they will need to be replaced with a new generation of workers that bring with them their own skills and work habits.

2. Know the potential results – the good, bad and the ugly
When used correctly, EHS technology can help organizations to overcome longstanding barriers that have prevented improvement in many areas and resulted in adverse incidents, according to Bussey. Some of the main hindrances include disparate systems, data sources and collaboration combined with information siloing. Good planning when making changes to an organization’s EHS standards will in turn produce desired results.

When implemented under a poorly planned design, new EHS technologies can present their own risks, whether they be through flaws in changes to operations or vulnerabilities in networked IT systems or new IoT devices, for example. On a bad day, a business with a flawed workplace safety design and poor network security might see a minor injury or downtime. On the ugliest of days, these could result in severe injuries to personnel, major downtime and any associated penalties or legal proceedings.

According to ISHN, it’s recommended that administrators and managers know their organizations’ current EHS tech integration plans and work with all teams involved. This can help to get a stronger understanding of the changes that will take place and manage any associated risks.

3. Know that modern EHS tools are varied
Different industries require different solutions when it comes to today’s digital EHS solutions, while organizations with existing EHS systems and solutions in place may require the adoption of new technologies in certain areas, but don’t need a complete overhaul.

One broad example of the capabilities of modern EHS technologies is what EHS Daily Advisor reports is the use of virtual reality goggles and associated software for employee safety training. In the energy industry, more specifically, one modern EHS solution is the deployment of drones fitted with specialized technology for inspections on oil rigs and ships, among other properties, according to Quartz. In turn, this improves operational efficiency and allows for a reallocation of human resources away from avoidable risky scenarios.

When considering EHS mobile applications for business use on popular smartphones, for example, IMEC Technologies recommends that one first consider whether they field proven, native to certain brands and have the ability to be efficiently scaled to a certain number of users. An application array used effectively should record more data than previously thought possible, which can provide new insights into hazards and required remediation efforts.

ProcessMAP provides EHS tools that can innovate companies’ safety cultures. Connect with us to learn more about how you can improve your workplace risk management today.

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Why You Should Focus On Incident Management

Why You Should Focus On Incident Management

Workplace safety lapses continue to occur despite the development of preventive engineering solutions. Employers reported 2.9 million nonfatal worker injuries and illnesses in 2016, according to data from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. More shockingly, more than 5,100 employees died on the clock over the same 12-month span. While both of these figures constitute historical lows, room for significant improvement exists. Environmental health and safety stakeholders can catalyze progress and see further reductions in worker injury and fatality rates by putting into place formalized incident management strategies and the tools that support them.

Understanding incident management

The concept of incident management encompasses a variety of preventive and reactive workplace safety strategies and solutions, according to EHS Today. These processes hinge ondata – specifically risk assessment information that covers the many inter-dependencies that exist within an operation. For example, when an industrial firm understands that minute administrative workflows in purchasing directly affect hazardous material management processes, it can ensure that acquisition personnel acquire the individual protective equipment needed to keep employees safe as they handle caustic raw material or byproduct. This is an example of a preventive incident management process.

“OSHA distributed more than 58,700 violations in 2016 and assessed financial penalties totaling over $1.4 billion.”

Reactive functions unfold following an injury – these include emergency medical, claims management and long-term disability management services. In addition to these activities, firms with strong incident management strategies support worksite investigation practices. This allows them to understand the variables that led to a specific workplace safety lapse and collect insights that can be used for preventive purposes, according to OSHA. Again, data is the key here, allowing operational and EHS leaders to learn from their mistakes and develop and deploy improved workflows that not only bolster productivity and protect employees but also lead to reductions in expenses associated with workers’ compensation payouts and fines. OSHA distributed more than 58,700 violations in 2016 and assessed financial penalties totaling over $1.4 billion.

Incident management

Implementing incident management processes

Many organizations leave themselves open to serious workplace safety lapses and the fines and losses in productivity that often follow them. Why? A large number of business leaders fail to grasp how large a role EHS operations play in bolstering the bottom line, according to the National Safety Council.

The business case for investment in incident management processes and similar workflows is clear. For example, the NSC found that 60 percent of chief financial officers see returns of $2 or more for each $1 they spend on EHS strategy and technology development.

Businesses looking to leave antiquated notions regarding workplace safety behind and embrace incident management protocols that build the groundwork for safer, more prosperous operations should start by bolstering their data collection capabilities via Incident Management Software. Here at ProcessMAP we produce such solutions, lending organizations the power to gather sharp shop floor insights and cultivate cultures of safety while boosting productivity and reducing the likelihood of violations. 

Connect with us today to learn more about our technology.   

Get a Free Incident Management Software Demo

 

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ProcessMAP Konnect 2019: Digital Innovation And Data Intelligence

ProcessMAP Konnect 2019: Digital Innovation And Data Intelligence

ProcessMap held its customer conference in late May in Hollywood, FL.  The event — ProcessMAP Konnect 2019 — reminded us of the famous Forest Gump line, “Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you’re gonna get.”  This was the first time LNS Research participated in the environment, health, and safety (EHS) software vendor’s annual conference, so we had no preconceptions. ProcessMAP’s ecosystem of customers, partners, and experts gathered to discuss and collaborate on strategy, progress, best practices, solutions, and plans.

The two-day event was indeed like a box of chocolates, packed with a variety of content, solutions, and advice for getting value from ProcessMAP solutions.  This post provides coverage of major themes and announcements, and an analysis for ProcessMAP customers and the market.

Strategic Pillars

The conference kicked off with EVP of Customer Success, Todd Jones setting the stage, followed by CEO Dave Rath and Chief Strategy Officer Harold Gubnitsky presenting the big picture of progress and plan. 

ProcessMAP Konnect

They discussed strategic pillars for ProcessMAP’s continued growth and customer success:

  • Customer success 3.0
  • User experience (UX) and adoption
  • System performance and security
  • Data intelligence
  • Stakeholder value beyond EHS
  • Innovations for today and future
  • Partner ecosystem for solution delivery

The company zeroed in on plans to enhance customer support and success initiatives, and rightfully so. Certainly all the strategic pillars are important themes, but we view three as critical success factors for ProcessMAP and its customers:  innovation, data intelligence, and partner ecosystem.

Innovations for Today and the Future

The company announced an impressive array of 14 innovations and new capabilities spanning core platform capabilities, analytics, and new functionality. Core platform improvements available within the next quarter include a new UI, extended mobile apps, Application Builder 2.0, 25 “ready-to-use” preconfigured apps,  an adoption/usage analytics portal, an artificial intelligence (AI) assistant to complete tasks such as incident reporting, and a new best practices resource library, among several others.

ProcessMAP is also investing in providing integrated, cross-functional views of data needed to optimize risk management and extend value to more stakeholders. This includes “Risk Point,” which brings together a variety of information on connected events to help put large data sets into context for facility risk visualization. Likewise, the “ProcessMAP One” initiative focuses on bringing often-siloed data together into an integrated view, for example, training, competencies, operational performance, maintenance, and inspection data needed to consider all contributing factors in an incident investigation.  Enabling an Internet of Things (IoT) framework is a priority for ProcessMAP, including out-of-the-box connectors for operational Big Data, e.g., sensor-generated data from connected worker wearables.

Focus on Data Intelligence

Another major theme throughout the conference was data intelligence, which we view as the lifecycle management of data and converting it to actionable insights to drive performance improvement.  The EHS vendor emphasized this topic as a strategic pillar and embedded it throughout the innovation discussions and other customer case study sessions.

Data management has long been a core capability for EHS software platforms. The original emphasis on reporting and descriptive analytics has been superseded by the trend towards more sophisticated predictive analytics that take advantage of Big Data and the transformative technologies of Industry 4.0. ProcessMAP is investing in delivering these capabilities to customers as exemplified by the IoT framework to leverage sensor-generated Big Data. Another example is its “Smart Agents” advanced analytics project, which uses automated rules-based engines to find look for actionable data patterns and insights continuously. Especially noteworthy is the delivery of these capabilities as “data analytics as a service” on a subscription basis, enabling customers to apply ProcessMAP’s data science resources to their issues on demand.

Digital Innovation with Solution Partnerships

We have long held the view that a healthy partner ecosystem is critical to the long-term success of any enterprise software vendor and its customers.  After all, customers aren’t looking merely for “products;” instead, they want real-world solutions that deliver value.  ProcessMAP emphasized its commitment to partnerships throughout the event, including alliances that leverage innovative digital technologies that integrate with and extend the ProcessMAP platform.

Innovative partner solutions presented included Predictive Safety’s cognitive assessment solution to manage fatigue-related accident risks; the SafeDriver app/system for fleet safety; the SmartCone connected worker multi-hazard IoT solution; and the Opal connected worker location tracking solution.  These solutions demonstrated the power of harnessing digital technologies, data, and advanced analytics to reduce risk and improve productivity.

Perhaps the most intriguing and potentially impactful partner announcement was that IBM has teamed up with ProcessMAP in a strategic move to focus on improving workplace safety through IoT-enabled solutions with advanced analytics.  The partnership will leverage IBM Watson IoT and the ProcessMAP EHS platform to monitor and analyze exposure to workplace safety and health hazards, enabling real-time identification of and response to hazards, and identification of risk patterns and trends that can be used for preventive intervention based on predictive analytics.

Takeaways and Final Thoughts

If a conference can be like a box of chocolates, ProcessMAP Konnect 2019 delivered a wide variety of interesting offerings, among which we observed many positives. It’s evident that the company has a significant installed base with which it is collaborating to enhance and improve the total ProcessMAP solution offering.  The firm is firmly focused on customer success, with an unusually strategic approach that includes explicit alignment with each customer’s business objectives, and executive participation in quarterly business reviews.

ProcessMAP is backing these efforts with R&D investments that are yielding tangible results in the form of improvements to the core platform, new functionality, and leveraging the transformative technologies of Industry 4.0.  Everyone knows that companies can (and do) embark on Industrial Transformation with or without the proactive participation of the EHS business function.  ProcessMAP provides customers a path forward to take advantage of the opportunity with its emphasis on data intelligence, the IoT framework, and partnerships with technology innovators such as IBM and Predictive Safety, among others.

While driving positive momentum across many initiatives, ProcessMAP should exercise caution to not dilute efforts too much and ensure that each customer initiative captures real-world business value that’s well-documented and articulated. The EHS software competitive landscape is crowded and includes players backed by large, well-resourced global organizations.  ProcessMAP’s aggressive moves to embrace digital technologies through development investments and partnerships, coupled with core platform improvements, position it well for continued success, given a sufficiently differentiated go-to-market strategy. We look forward to tracking the vendor’s progress and results over time.

This blog was originally published on LNS Research website – Click Here

Re-published with required permission. 

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Mitigate Health & Safety Risk And Reap Financial Rewards

Mitigate Health & Safety Risk And Reap Financial Rewards

When it comes to workplace safety, health and safety managers can never take too many precautions. But routine procedure can fall by the wayside to quicker methods that create more profit but also additional risk.

Small and mid-sized business often don’t realize they can have the best of both worlds. Environmental, Health and Safety software provides a streamlined and transparent safety culture, all the while ensuring its return on investment.

Environmental, Health and Safety software at your workplace

“EHS software is catered to your industry.”

Each EHS software can be configured to meet certain industries’ needs, but there are a few key functions that define it across the board. By automating regulatory compliance, making accident data visible in all cases and placing increased scrutiny on employee safety, businesses experience less productivity downtime and greater operational efficiency.

While it may seem as though these systems are best developed to keep workplaces safe in environments where there’s little oversight, like large businesses, the fact of the matter is  small and mid-sized business often benefit the most from the software’s inclusion. Consider these figures gathered by the Asbestos Institute:

  • Companies ranging from 1 to 99 employees received 80,654 citations from OSHA in 2013, totaling $112.2 million.
  • Organizations with 100 or more workers were cited just 9,052 times for a grand total of $33.2 million.

Given those figures, small and mid-sized business need an overhaul of their safety cultures, as they are currently cited far more than large businesses.

7 Steps to Safety

Implementing EHS software allows employers to take advantage of steps to a better safety culture, as laid out by the Maine Department of Labor:

  1. Don’t half-heart safety: Safety managers need to be completely on board with the revisions that will take place, as they will fundamentally change day-to-day operations. This could come in the form of more training or perhaps better safety equipment.
  2. Get employees involved: An excellent safety culture starts from the ground up. To revolutionize how the organization views risk at the workplace, workers need to have input and be willing to make a change.
  3. Find the right system: Adopting the perfect EHS system is key. Consider what types of regulations or standards for which your company regularly receives citations. Remember OSHA is changing its mandatory injury submission protocol, so you’ll need software that allows for automated and offline reporting.
  4. Ensure compliance: One of the best ways to cut down on compliance infractions is to dedicate time to understanding them and implementing safeguards across the board.
  5. Practice, practice, practice: Training is the best way to make sure the entire company is in line with industry-best safety practices. Use predictive analytics to understand where the majority of risks originate, and create training regiments that aim to mitigate these issues.
  6. Everyone gets a voice: In the perfect culture, entry-level employees need to feel safe enough to tell a C-suite executive on a worksite to put on safety gear. This will ensure everyone adopts the new strategies.
  7. Rinse and repeat: By addressing the safety culture each year—even if there hasn’t been any accidents—facility managers remind everyone that safety is the top priority.
EHS Software
Every employee needs to be on board with the safety culture.

Where’s the ROI?

Nothing in business is free. However, there are multiple avenues in which EHS software pays its keep with:

  • Fewer drops in productivity.
  • Reduced spending on workers’ compensation and associated legal fees.
  • Decreased expenditures on citations and compliance infractions.
  • Increased time for employees dedicated to EHS operations.

EHS software benefits exist across the board. This versatility allows small and mid-sized businesses to earn back the investment they’ve made, as well as keep employees safe.

Key takeaway: EHS software streamlines a number of previously manually completed tasks, as well as improves the bottom line.

Has your company implemented EHS software yet? Leave us a comment below and let us know where you’ve seen improvements.

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